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#221 Space Voyager

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 12:46 PM

I still can't understand that this damn polyurethane is so useful and all-terrain applicable.

#222 Zombie

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 03:09 PM

Polyurethane really can be used for anything, and it's preferred most times too. I guess some points to make about it would be helpful:
  • Wears like iron, aka, it's durable. Whereas latex paint would chip or shred off if you dragged something hard or heavy over it, polyurethane would resist that action.
  • It's glossy and nonporous surface can be washed time and time again with little wear and resists staining. I wash that long table in the backroom about three times a week and it still looks great, plus it doesn't absorb stain causing materials.
  • Has a thick film which allows you to fill in cracks and create a totally smooth surface in 1-2 coats. Latex paint has some of these properties, but takes a long time to dry with a very thick film, and oil paint has a thin film which requires multiple coats which puts something out of commission for a while.
  • It's waterproof. Need I say more? Plus it kinda beads up water making cleanup easy.
The only thing it really isn't good for is walls (more like drywall or porous materials like wood). I use polyurethane for wood but have to prime it with latex paint first because it'll soak into the grain otherwise (it's oil based).

So yeah, the stuff is useful and can be used basically anywhere. :)

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#223 Space Voyager

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:57 AM

Thanks, I really need to take a looong look at this thread when I continue with the house...

What happens if you apply it to wood? It won't dry properly? Two coatings wouldn't help? Good solution with latex paint, though that kinda makes the base less solid, right? Probably not a problem as the outer coating prevents any damage to the base...

Also, I need an advice. If you were to lay the hallway floor in a house, which material would you use? Tiles, vinyl, laminate? I'm looking at vinyl as it is pretty durable as I'm told.

#224 Zombie

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 01:19 AM

View PostSpace Voyager, on 03 December 2019 - 06:57 AM, said:

What happens if you apply it to wood? It won't dry properly? Two coatings wouldn't help? Good solution with latex paint, though that kinda makes the base less solid, right? Probably not a problem as the outer coating prevents any damage to the base...

You can apply polyurethane to wood no problem. Trouble is, it is usually an oil base which will cause the stuff to soak into the wood and then you will not have a nice uniform glossy finish (the grains of the wood will be dull). That's why I put down a base coat of latex paint first then go over the top of that with the polyurethane - the latex will fill in those pores and prevent the top coat from soaking away. Sure, you can keep piling coat after coat of poly on raw wood and eventually it'll fill in, but the latex saves you all those intermediate steps.Posted Image

The latex doesn't really make the base less solid. If you use a decent latex for the base coat it should stick just fine and would probably wear fairly good the way it is unless it has heavy stuff dragging over it. And in this case, the polyurethane will be the thing taking the brunt of the activity, which it can handle easily.Posted Image

View PostSpace Voyager, on 03 December 2019 - 06:57 AM, said:

Also, I need an advice. If you were to lay the hallway floor in a house, which material would you use? Tiles, vinyl, laminate? I'm looking at vinyl as it is pretty durable as I'm told.

Hmmm, that really depends on a number of factors. What is the flooring in the other rooms which connect to the hallway? How ornate is the hallway? You don't want to ruin the look of the hallway by using vinyl flooring, especially if it is an entrance hallway. How much use will the hallway get? Are you planning on selling your house in the near future? Do you mind a cold floor? What material are you most comfortable installing? ;)

If it would be up to me, I'd use tile for a very ornate entrance hallway especially if you were planning on selling your house in the next few years. You'll probably get a good return on investment there. For just a normal hallway between rooms, I'd probably go for laminate wood flooring. It wears decent, and installs dirt easy. Here in the US laminate flooring is a big selling feature too. For a back hallway or one that doesn't get seen much or takes heavy wear then vinyl would probably be a good choice. :)

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#225 Space Voyager

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 07:00 AM

Yes, I agree, there are a number of factors. I'm not selling and it is a hallway between our living room, bathroom etc.. It will see moderate use.

But I wouldn't count vinyl out just yet. Vinyl floor is used just as laminate, except that it is supposed to be more durable. You're probably referring to the linoleum floor, which CAN be ugly as hell.

Anyway, the tiles in our hallway were laid without the gaps (40 years ago) and have recently risen into a tent-like structure... Naturally, I threw them away but now I'm thinking about what to do with the hallway. Funny though, the cat loves the rough floor.

#226 Zombie

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 03:36 AM

Here, I took some pics (December 2) of the boards showing the polyurethane enamel side and the latex back.

DSC09765JPG.jpg DSC09766JPG.jpg DSC09767JPG.jpg


The first pic compares the sheen and the other two pics compares the color. The polyurethane is more of a blood red while the latex is kinda pinkish red. In order to get the colors to show better I used a really bright flash and complete darkness in the garage so this is at the extreme end of the lighting spectrum. They look much closer in person and in normal lighting conditions. In the end it will not matter much as everything is getting the polyurethane on it. ;)

Got a rude surprise this afternoon. A picture is worth 1000 words so I took two...

DSC09768JPG.jpg DSC09769JPG.jpg


Partial roof collapse of the greenhouse due to two days of snow. It wasn't a lot of snow, just really heavy and wet. Now, I knew this was going to happen eventually as I patched a couple long tears along the poles in the middle this fall. Kinda surprised it held on as long as it did. It's just unfortunate it didn't hold on till after Valentines Day though as the space is basically unusable now. Oh well. But hey, think of the bright side -  you'll get to see how I put on a new plastic top when the weather warms up this spring. Excited? Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#227 Thorondor

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 03:26 PM

Should the roof come down - furrow not your brow - for Zombie is around! :)

Holy cow, polyurethane and latex paint colour nuances be danged, how are you going to sort that whole disaster area?! :oh:

I assume you're joking about waiting for Spring though. I mean, you're bound to get some reprieve from snowfall for a day or two eventually, I'd imagine.

And at least there doesn't seem to be irreversible damage to what is fundamental - the support structure itself seems salvageable.

#228 Zombie

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 01:55 AM

View PostThorondor, on 14 January 2020 - 03:26 PM, said:

Holy cow, polyurethane and latex paint colour nuances be danged, how are you going to sort that whole disaster area?! Posted Image

What disaster area? The inside of the greenhouse? Well, I worked on that a little bit today. Thankfully it was above freezing (36-37F or +2-3C?) so nothing was frozen into ice. First I shoveled out the snow from the ground which allowed me to get at the stuff on the tables. Then I knocked off the snow from the wreaths, took the bows and decorations off (those can be reused for next year), piled the wreaths on to my gray cart I fixed this summer and rolled them to the dumpster for disposal.

DSC09771JPG.jpg DSC09773JPG.jpg

I used some concrete blocks to hold down the flaps of the top to keep that from getting worse. I'd much rather have the center area with snow than the ends because that's where the doors are.

With the stuff off the tables, I shoveled the snow off them and squeegeed them so they were dry-ish. I needed the tables somewhat dry because the half of the top that was still good yet was starting to peel back from the wind and I wanted to put a ladder on the tables to fix that (polyurethane is very slippery when wet and I don't want to break a leg). I used some clear packaging tape to get the flap attached to the center pole, but remembered I purchased a roll of Gorilla tape recently so I thought that might be better as it's a lot stickier. So I used about a half a roll of that to secure the flap down.

DSC09772JPG.jpg

Have no idea if this will hold. Probably will for at least a little bit until it snows heavily again or is super windy. All told I think I spent 2 total hours on this project.

View PostThorondor, on 14 January 2020 - 03:26 PM, said:

I assume you're joking about waiting for Spring though. I mean, you're bound to get some reprieve from snowfall for a day or two eventually, I'd imagine.

Nope, not joking. Completely serious. Here's the deal: what happens if I somehow get the new top installed and then there's a huge snowfall and the top collapses again? Then we are out of new tops and need to reorder (and these tops aren't exactly cheap if you catch my drift - I think it was something like $400+ per top - 10 mil and UV stabilized with a 7 year life). Also all the snow along the sides of the greenhouse needs to be gone, the ground needs to be somewhat dry, and free from dirt, stones and anything else which might harm the plastic.

DSC09770JPG.jpg

That old HVAC unit needs to get removed too (the guys are supposedly coming soon... we shall see). The sheet of plastic isn't just the top, it's a continuous piece that covers the sides too. That's why everything needs to be free from snow. Plus I need at least a day to unscrew the strapping, remove the old plastic and do any maintenance on the structure before installation can occur. Then I need a somewhat warm day (mid to high 40's F so 5-10C) because it's hard to hold on to plastic with gloves on and when your hands are cold. Call me a wussy on that but it goes so much faster when you aren't battling cold fingers and putting on/taking off gloves constantly. And I need a day where I'm not going to be interrupted with other projects (last time I installed the top I did it on a Sunday when I could focus 100% on it). Finally (and this is most important) the day I do this cannot have much wind! If the wind catches the plastic it's like a ginormous sail flapping in the breeze. And it would be nice to have another person there to help (I could maybe call in a favor to the guy that helped me the last time and maybe I can sweet talk the bosses young son into it). Posted Image

So, long story short, tl;dr: There's more to putting up a new top than you might imagine and the weather has to be decent. The weather just isn't going to cooperate this early in the winter. With that said, I do have the top of the greenhouse from 2010-ish (at least a part of it). Might be able to chuck that over the busted out area and use that to limp us through to spring. It's an option if we have a few nicer days and I have the time. Posted Image

The major issue is rushing to get it done quickly. You can't do that without cutting corners and making a mistake somewhere or risking the top getting damaged in another snowfall. I've found it best to wait till you can cross your t's, dot your i's, get your ducks in a row and eliminate all possible risks. The top has a listed life of 7 years and I want to do everything I can to get it to last that long. I've had a pretty good track record of getting these tops to last and don't want to mess that up. Posted Image

View PostThorondor, on 14 January 2020 - 03:26 PM, said:

And at least there doesn't seem to be irreversible damage to what is fundamental - the support structure itself seems salvageable.

Yep, nothing wrong with the tubing. Just the plastic that tore. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#229 Thorondor

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 09:09 PM

Yep, the inside of the greenhouse already shows a significant difference given your intervention, Zombie. Posted Image

Your explanation also makes the big picture of what - safely - putting in a new top really requires. Numerous things need to come together just right not to waste the effort (and potentially run into more expenses), so I now get why it makes sense to wait it out.

I hope you get a suitable break with the weather so those makeshift repairs with what's left of the old top you mention can be done.

If not, you might perhaps consider instead some temporary way to cover those tabletops to better shield them from the elements.

#230 Space Voyager

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 10:12 AM

Damn, the roof collapsing is crap - though I AM excited to see your work, I learn something new with every post you make! Sorry, I'm a bit self-centered. :D

I hope this incident won't have a huge impact on the shop. You still plan to use the place before the renovation?

#231 Zombie

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 02:47 PM

View PostThorondor, on 15 January 2020 - 09:09 PM, said:

I hope you get a suitable break with the weather so those makeshift repairs with what's left of the old top you mention can be done. If not, you might perhaps consider instead some temporary way to cover those tabletops to better shield them from the elements.

Yeah, if I find a couple scraps of plastic from the old top I could cover up the tables a bit. Trouble is, I'd have to put a ton of bricks or blocks on it to prevent the wind from ripping the plastic right off the tables. (I think some people think it's just the snow we have to deal with in winter. No sir, it's the wind too. It's almost always really strong this time of the year).

So we had another snow storm here yesterday. Something like 6-7 inches (15+cm for sure) and really strong winds too. The greenhouse was filled with snow again and the wind was so strong it ripped the plastic the concrete blocks were sitting on. I did a quick fix and put the blocks on the plastic on top of the middle table to keep it from getting worse. Thankfully, my Gorilla tape fix seems to have held up just fine with all the strong wind blowing into the hole in the top.

View PostSpace Voyager, on 16 January 2020 - 10:12 AM, said:

Damn, the roof collapsing is crap - though I AM excited to see your work, I learn something new with every post you make! Sorry, I'm a bit self-centered. Posted Image

No problem. I'm glad you are interested. It's not very often you get to see a greenhouse top replaced so this is a good opportunity to show how it's done. I'm not exactly an expert in this field as I do it so infrequently (think of the maintenance guys at the big commercial growing operations where they might have to replace a bunch of them every year - hats off to them). That's why I want to get the bosses son to help - it's a great learning experience for him and gives him some experience in case this happens again (heaven forbid).

View PostSpace Voyager, on 16 January 2020 - 10:12 AM, said:

I hope this incident won't have a huge impact on the shop. You still plan to use the place before the renovation?

In the winter we just use the greenhouse for storage. For example, I'll fill up the back garage with deliveries for Valentines Day, but in order to fit everything in I usually move some things out to the greenhouse until the deliveries are out. And of course, there are other times where something is in the way and I'll temporarily store it in the greenhouse. Plus all the cardboard boxes that the flowers come in go into the greenhouse (we usually give the bigger ones back to our suppliers and I'll cut the smaller ones in half and staple them for flower arrangement carriers).

So we might still store stuff in the greenhouse but nothing of significance. I'm probably just going to use the smaller garage for storage. ;)

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#232 Thorondor

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 03:38 PM

Sounds like you've got your work cut out for you, Zombie - continually inclement weather and a busy commercial season in a little under a month to get ready for.

You're really not going to get any rest, particularly with the shoveling end of things in the greenhouse.

Unless you can find some way to make it so that, even if it snows considerably, stuff is safeguarded enough that you can let it sit a while, the extra daily workout is going to be a given in your fitness regimen for the season. ;)

#233 Zombie

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:56 AM

Shoveling the greenhouse isn't going to be a priority for me as it'll be an uphill battle at this time of the year. ;) So yeah, the snow is going to have to sit for a while and either melt on its own or wait for me to get some time to shovel it out to the driveway to melt. I will try to keep the half under cover clear from snow as much as I can though as both sides are accessible from the doors. It all depends how busy I am and whether or not I get some help (aka the bosses son likes to help me out on projects). Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#234 Zombie

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Posted 04 March 2020 - 02:36 AM

So I've been trying to keep the snow out of the greenhouse as much as I could the past month and a half. Hasn't been exactly easy as I always have other things I need to do inside and out. Plus the weather isn't always decent so shoveling isn't practical. But this past week the weather wasn't too bad (above freezing during the day, got to 6C today with sun) so I was able to start removing the snow along the sides.

DSC09774JPG.jpg DSC09775JPG.jpg

The north side of the greenhouse (the side that faces the small garage wall I painted and planted perennials) obviously had a lot of snow buildup as the top is still up along that side (the snow just slides down the plastic to the ground). The south side of the greenhouse faces the store and didn't have a lot of buildup there because most of the snow fell inside. The cleanup started with the south side first and then I tackled part of the north side. Most of the snow I piled up along the west side of the greenhouse which faces the parking lot and part also went along the wall of the back room on the driveway. Both those areas get sun exposure so the snow will melt quicker there. I removed the snow inside the greenhouse a few days ago so that area was ok but the tables in the middle were filthy dirty. Ended up washing them with some soapy water remnants which I used to wash the delivery vans with earlier that day.

DSC09776JPG.jpg

Wouldn't you know it, but the tables were still pretty dirty today so I ended up washing them again with soap water from the van (if the weather is above freezing I try to wash the delivery vehicle we used that day to remove the salt and dirt buildup). The weather was even nicer today so I shoveled the remainder of the snow along the north side of the greenhouse and was even able to remove the ice from under the part I shoveled yesterday. Hopefully the remainder of the ice will loosen up and allow me to remove that tomorrow.

DSC09777JPG.jpg

Hopefully the HVAC guys are coming soon to get rid of the old unit and the two reservoirs of Freon. If not, I'll end up moving them into the driveway to get them out of the way.

With the snow mostly out of the way I could now inspect the greenhouse to look for any potential maintenance issues. I did notice that some of the strapping along the ground have rotten spots so I'll need to pick up a few replacement straps from the lumberyard. And I'm probably going to put more fiberfill batting around the connection points (where the side rafters connect to the ridge pole) and wherever there are sharp pieces of metal. I put some fiberfill on those points the last time which really seemed to help prevent premature tearing. The door on the west side of the greenhouse isn't working very good so I need to work on that too. Posted Image

After the maintenance issues have been addressed I can probably start to remove the old plastic from along the south side of the greenhouse first. I'm not going to touch the other part that's still up until I schedule a replacement date for the new top to go up. If the weather holds out and we don't get too much snow forecast I might be able to get it up by the middle to end of March. All depends on precipitation, temperature and wind. If those cooperate for a weekend I'll definitely try my best. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#235 Thorondor

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Posted 04 March 2020 - 09:56 AM

Why am I not surprised, Zombie, to see you soldiering on - be there rain, snow or glaring sunshine? :)

The inside of the greenhouse looks very well kept indeed, particularly given the circumstances. And I don't think even the tables are having much reason to complain, retaining their cheerful colours like that. ;)

That HVAC unit sure is ready for retirement though, so a replacement is well in order.

Hope you get a suitable break in the weather soonish then, as I can imagine how much of a relief that would provide from constant shoveling duties.

#236 Zombie

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 10:39 PM

View PostThorondor, on 04 March 2020 - 09:56 AM, said:

That HVAC unit sure is ready for retirement though, so a replacement is well in order.

It's an old unit that was used (far in the past) to heat/cool/ventilate the backroom and area by the back cooler. The ventilation aspect was the only thing that actually worked on it for a while (I remember turning it on in summer when it was blazing hot to at least give the guys in the back some respite from the heat). But that part died a while back and never got fixed. So it sat there quietly rusting in place for the last 20 years or so and just began to leak water inside. When we replaced the HVAC for the store this past fall we had to rent a crane to lift the old one off and raise the new one up. Before that happened I told the boss that since we would have the crane there we should take down that old unit and cap off the hole so it doesn't leak anymore. So the HVAC guys took it down and capped the hole but didn't get around to removing the old unit yet. So that's the story. Posted Image

View PostThorondor, on 04 March 2020 - 09:56 AM, said:

Hope you get a suitable break in the weather soonish then, as I can imagine how much of a relief that would provide from constant shoveling duties.

The bigger relief would be to get the new top installed. But yeah, constantly shoveling it out becomes tiring. Luckily, March has brought slightly warmer temps so any snow that falls should melt pretty fast. Posted Image

Well, it was warmer on Wednesday but the wind was still blowing strong so I decided to do a little work on the greenhouse. One thing led to another and I figured what the heck, let's start! Taking down the plastic is just like putting it up except in the reverse order. Bottom first, then the middle and the top for last (it's easier to remove the screws and the slats when you are standing up).

DSC09778JPG.jpg

The plastic is loose in this shot already. Since the ground was still icy and cold I used my low cart as a rolling workbench of sorts. I sat on a carpet remnant/sample to keep my bum a little warmer Posted Image, then started removing the screws from the lowest slats with my trusty old electric Skil drill (wish we would have a cordless drill/driver but this works fine). Chucked all the screws into a bucket sitting on the cart and when I couldn't reach any more screws I rolled myself to where I could. When I removed all the screws from a slat, I took it off and leaned them up against a wall to dry so I could inspect them later. Here's the setup:

DSC09779JPG.jpg

As I was rolling along I also removed whatever screws I could reach from the vertical slats. After I got to the end, I ditched the cart and stood up which makes removing the rest of screws and slats from the upper part a snap. When the plastic was loose I cut it into sections and hauled it into the greenhouse for the time being. I left one section of plastic in place as it was frozen to the ground and I figured I could use that to wrap up the park bench.

DSC09781JPG.jpg

If you have good eyes, you might notice that something is happening at the far end of the greenhouse as there is a green ladder under the door and an extension cord running along the ground. I was inspecting the plastic-less part of the greenhouse and remembered that there was a spot where the ridge pole connects to the end hoop where the previous plastic ripped a little. So I took a look and this is what I saw:

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To set the stage: the top metal tube is the end hoop. the lower tube is the ridge pole. The two are connected together by a figure 8 piece of metal with the loops offset by 90 degrees. That connecting piece has threaded holes so you can tighten in a set screw (in this case it's a machine bolt). Well, the ridge pole is sticking way too far out of the connecting piece and when it gets windy the plastic flaps against that sharp pole and ripped. Fixing this was fairly easy: I just cut about an inch (so 2.54 cm) off the end with a hacksaw which made it nearly flush with the connecting piece. The cut was crude and left some sharp bits so I used a rotary metal file in the drill to round off the end and remove the sharp edges.

The other issue is the set screw for the end hoop was improperly installed facing the outside of the greenhouse. That poky bit can can cause a stress tear to form with the wind and how tight I have to make the plastic. The screw should go on the inside where it can't touch the plastic. I thought about taking apart the end hoop and joints to turn the connecting piece around but that would take a lot of time and I might not get it back together properly so my fix for this was to drill a hole into the connecting piece from the inside to the proper size, then on Thursday I borrowed a tap from my dad to put threads into the hole. Found an unused bolt of the same size in my drawer of greenhouse parts/hardware, tightened that up then rewrapped the whole connection together with a sheet of fiberfill and kept that in place with sisal binder twine. No poky bits there anymore! I still have to check the opposite side of the greenhouse to see if that needs the same attention. Posted Image

So with that bucket of screws I dumped the whole thing on the countertop in the backroom and sorted them into three piles: good, so-so and bad. The good ones I'll reuse. The bad ones were either rusty, chowdered (this means that the threads are messed up or the Phillips head is stripped out) or bent and those screws were tossed out. The so-so screws were looked over a little more carefully and I cherry picked the best ones out of that to keep. I luckily purchased a bunch of extra screws the last time I installed the top/side of the greenhouse so I can replace the bad ones with brand new. (Always purchase extra hardware, you never know if/when/where you'll need them)! Posted Image

I looked over the slats when I removed them and some appeared pretty bad at that time. After I let them dry for a few days I can see that not all of the bad ones are garbage. I might be able to clean those off like I did to the other slats last year and reuse them. I'm going to wait a little more and check on them again. If they aren't worth the effort of cleaning then I'll just get some new ones. Besides, there is at least two bad ones I'll need to replace anyway and if I'm there buying slats maybe it's easier to get new. Posted Image

Today the temps were nice and warm. But the wind was just terrible so there would be no way to install a new top with the plastic flopping around in the wind like a sail. Hopefully as we get later in March the temps will warm slightly and the wind will die down for one day. At this point I don't really care if the temps stay around the freezing mark, as long as the wind is quiet I'll tackle installing the new top no problem. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#237 Thorondor

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 12:27 PM

Regardless of means of locomotion you can always trust Zombie to set things in motion! ;)

Plastic cover remnants on the way out, strapping/slat removal, bolt screening and replacement, slat inspection, metal tubing edge trimmed and defanged with potentially offending top bolt relocation underway, thinking to likewise inspect what's on the opposite end - I'm liking your careful prep work so far. :)

Speed bumps: inclement winds. Well, Spring is just around the bend and as you've said before, it's best not to risk ruining the new top by rushing anything.

#238 Space Voyager

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 03:03 PM

He he he, this will never end. Just like house maintenance, always something that either goes wrong or will do so SOON. Kudos, Zombie!

#239 Zombie

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Posted 13 March 2020 - 01:37 AM

View PostThorondor, on 09 March 2020 - 12:27 PM, said:

Plastic cover remnants on the way out, strapping/slat removal, bolt screening and replacement, slat inspection, metal tubing edge trimmed and defanged with potentially offending top bolt relocation underway, thinking to likewise inspect what's on the opposite end - I'm liking your careful prep work so far. Posted Image

Speed bumps: inclement winds. Well, Spring is just around the bend and as you've said before, it's best not to risk ruining the new top by rushing anything.

Exactly. If I take the time to do it right maybe I will not have to do it for a while. Not that I mind putting on a new top/side, it's just a little bit stressful because I have to balance my normal work responsibilities while still making progress.

View PostSpace Voyager, on 09 March 2020 - 03:03 PM, said:

He he he, this will never end. Just like house maintenance, always something that either goes wrong or will do so SOON. Kudos, Zombie!

Very, very true. And it's even more true when you are dealing with a building that is old. Maintenance is nearly an ongoing work in progress. As soon as you make headway on one project, another will rear it's ugly head. Posted Image

So I did do a little more work on the greenhouse, not a lot though as it snowed and it was windy/cold most days. (So much for an early spring, eh)? On Tuesday it was chilly and windy but the sun was out so I figured I could probably find something to do. Since I fixed the top West side of the greenhouse I got a ladder out and checked the East side. Luckily there were no set screw issues there. The ridge pole was a little bit long, so I decided to hack that part off. In this pic I'm nearly through

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I had to saw from the bottom up as the hoop was blocking a straight cut. Need I mention that hacksawing upwards is difficult? It is. Posted Image The section I hacked off was approximately 1-1.5 cm thick. Was it necessary? Probably not, as I didn't see any rubbing or tearing of the plastic, but I'd much rather have it 100% fixed instead of finding out 3 years from now that something shifted and now there's a hole there. Of course, after I hacked the piece of pipe off I used the rotary file attachment on the drill to smooth out the rough edges. From the pic it looks like I'm really high up, but I'm 6 ft + standing on top of a 8 ft ladder so really it's only up about 5 meters. You can probably make out the plastic remnants laying on the ground inside. After it snowed yesterday I put those pieces on top of the tables in the middle and today I hauled them out to the dumpster for disposal (I'd love to recycle all that plastic, but it's so dirty and brittle that it's just easier to toss it).

Took a group photo of the lineup.

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Starting at the top and going clockwise: drill w/file attachment, pile of used screws which are good, ring of metal tubing from the East side, ring from the West and pile of so-so screws. There are some screws in the so-so pile which have rusty/chowdered heads so those will obviously be thrown out. I'm guessing I'll be able to salvage half that pile for reuse. On the far right of the pic is a piece of slat for use as a sample. Talked the boss into getting new slats for half the greenhouse. I certainly can salvage enough used slats to make up half (going to use those for the lower section), and the other (upper) half will be new. So that's good news. The slats will again be green treated so they can stand up to high-moisture conditions. Hopefully we will get another decent day so I can work on replacing/fixing up the fiberfill sheets on all the joints.

I'm honestly starting to get a little worried about the coronavirus outbreak. Posted Image So I took some time off from the outside to work on the inside today. Disinfected all the tables in the back and the delivery area and put away a glassware order. This weekend I'm going to disinfect the workstations and clean/bleach the floors just to make sure nothing is festering over the weekend. If something should happen where we have to close down due to the outbreak then I at least can still work on the greenhouse by myself alone. Gotta make sure the boss buys the new slats so if the shit should hit the fan Posted Image at least I can still forge ahead. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#240 Space Voyager

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Posted 13 March 2020 - 05:50 AM

Sawing upwards definitely IS hard, we're designed for climbing, less so for lifting. Good choice to do it though.

I'm worried about the virus, too, especially for my elderly mother.

But ooooooh, a shit hit the fan smiley! Niiiiiice! I'm still thinking of starting a new repository after being screwed by Photobucket.




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