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Let's Paint!


Zombie

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Well, a couple weeks ago I cleaned up inside the greenhouse after the planting season was kinda wrapping up. Bleached off all the tables and boards but had some bucket soap in the solution as well as a couple other soaps to hopefully speed up the process. Let that sit wet for about a half an hour, then scrubbed it with some more bleach+soap. Again, let that sit for a little bit, then hosed it all off:

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Not bad at all. There were a few areas where there was some peeling paint so I scratched that off and sanded it. Should be dry by now so I might prime it tomorrow if I have the time. (I have since weeded in there - all that's left is to stack up the boards on the tables to the right and then sweep it out). :)

One of the projects I always do around this time of the year is to bleach out all the "overflow" buckets leftover from Mother's Day. What are overflow buckets? Well, I have a couple stacks of buckets I have around for everyday use which are all the same size and type so it's easy to stack them. But when it gets busy I employ other buckets that are similar but not quite the same when the usual ones are used up. As the flowers get used I stack these overflow buckets off to the side (after rinsing them out with water) and when I'm confident that there aren't any more I bleach them out when it's quiet. So I did that on the 3rd and today I rinsed them all out and created a pyramid in the back garage so that they would dry:

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The white pails with the black labels contained 30# of powdered flower food. The pails on the lower part of the stack contained 5 gallons of concentrated liquid flower food. The two yellow pails are from a wholesaler which I return, and then there's a few miscellaneous 5 gallon pails on the 4th level. None of these stack properly with our usual 5 gallon pails, but they stack together just fine. Farther back is some 4-gallon black cooler buckets and in back of that is 3 levels of Procona rectangular buckets. All together, that's 60 pails. I could have probably did some non-overflow buckets but my feet were wet so I had to call it there. In the back is the new van, still haven't driven it yet, maybe someday. ;)

I have a bigger painting project which I'm going to start working on in a week or so. The lower part of the east side of the building needs to be painted (I scraped and primed it last year already). And the backroom/back garage wall on the east side has a lot of peeling paint now. I last painted that side in 2012 so it's definitely time. Probably need to pick up another 5 gallon pail as I only have 4 gallons presently. And I know there's going to be another "caulkpocalypse" involved as there's some nasty cracks in the mortar. :sarcastic:

- Zombie

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Bleaching is a way of sanitizing something. It destroys bacteria and some viruses along with fungus, mold and biofilm (slime). It's also an optical whitener as it removes stains. Buckets that have been used will have bacteria in there. If that is allowed to sit, the bacteria will reproduce and eventually when you put a flower in that soup it will suck up the bacteria-laden water which will clog the small tubes in the stem and prevent further uptake. The heads will then wilt, dry up and die. And while the sanitizing aspect wasn't needed for the greenhouse, the bleach will break down/soften up dried old blooms which makes it easy to just flush them away with water. ;)

I use bucket soap in conjunction with bleach as it acts as an indicator how dirty a bucket is (easy to tell on a white bucket but darn near impossible on a black bucket). It also blocks microbial action over time so that stuff can't breed and colonize the bucket until it's used again. When I bleach everyday buckets, I leave the bleach+soap residual in the pail until I'm ready to use it. A little bit of a rinse and it's ready to go. On the overflow buckets, I remove the residual with rinsing, allow the bucket to dry, then stack them up according to size/type. (If you put them away wet and let it sit for a while the water acts like a lubricant and allows the buckets to stack tighter together and when you try to get them apart later the water prevents air from entering which would break the suction). Finally, a plastic bag goes over the top to prevent dust and debris from fouling it up. :)

- Zombie

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While naturally almost entirely devoid of life now, the greenhouse is looking good, Zombie, and the tabletops have retained that reflective wet look to them. Even if you've already had to sand some spots here and there that paint still can be said to have some true staying power.

And what can you be said to have bucketloads of? Well, buckets! :P

Pyramids of... stacked buckets - that's an almost russian-doll level of recurrence. The baskets behind them are kind of jealous, unable to match such conformity and union.

Maybe someone with little experience driving the new van could accidentally topple the haughty buckets and bring them down from their perch - the baskets conspire. ;)

You have no shortage of things to tend to, as mentioned, but pry your eyes away from the silky smooth paintjob of the sexy new van for a moment and, at the very forefront of the picture, you'll notice the cruel denting and some creasing found in the vicinity of the handle to the right.

Something for another time perhaps, when your assorted talents are less in demand. :)

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On 7/7/2024 at 8:51 PM, Zombie said:

Bleaching is a way of sanitizing something. It destroys bacteria and some viruses along with fungus, mold and biofilm (slime). It's also an optical whitener as it removes stains. Buckets that have been used will have bacteria in there. If that is allowed to sit, the bacteria will reproduce and eventually when you put a flower in that soup it will suck up the bacteria-laden water which will clog the small tubes in the stem and prevent further uptake. The heads will then wilt, dry up and die. And while the sanitizing aspect wasn't needed for the greenhouse, the bleach will break down/soften up dried old blooms which makes it easy to just flush them away with water. ;)

I use bucket soap in conjunction with bleach as it acts as an indicator how dirty a bucket is (easy to tell on a white bucket but darn near impossible on a black bucket). It also blocks microbial action over time so that stuff can't breed and colonize the bucket until it's used again. When I bleach everyday buckets, I leave the bleach+soap residual in the pail until I'm ready to use it. A little bit of a rinse and it's ready to go. On the overflow buckets, I remove the residual with rinsing, allow the bucket to dry, then stack them up according to size/type. (If you put them away wet and let it sit for a while the water acts like a lubricant and allows the buckets to stack tighter together and when you try to get them apart later the water prevents air from entering which would break the suction). Finally, a plastic bag goes over the top to prevent dust and debris from fouling it up. :)

- Zombie

Damn, didn't think it could have such a profound effect, especially since at home I never sanitize buckets or pots. Than again, I grow chillies, not gentle flowers.

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