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#541 Zombie

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Posted 20 October 2021 - 05:07 AM

Today was a gorgeous day in terms of weather, probably the last warm day of the year so I took full advantage of it. In the morning I went to the hardware store and picked up some of that wood hardener. It's supposedly a resin dissolved in acetone - when the acetone evaporates, it leaves behind the resin which dries and hardens like a plastic inside the wood (takes 2-4 hours). I had a crusty old plastic container I used for cleaning out red polyurethane paintbrushes so I poured about a cup of that hardener in the container and kept brushing it on the wood till the stuff was gone. The acetone stripped the old paint right off the container so most of that ended up on the wood, nobody is going to see that anyway so it doesn't matter. ;)

While waiting for the wood hardener to do it's business I started work on the threshold. First was drilling and countersinking holes in the cutoff piece of wood from the side. Then I caulked the corner where it met the side board and drove some screws down tight (making sure to leave a little space for the weatherstripping). The board was about 2 1/2 inches too short so I cut a piece off the old top and spliced that in, making sure to caulk everything. Since I was down there, I also attached the lower part of the frame for the screen door.

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Picked up some coated 2 1/2" and 3 1/2" screws at the hardware store which they haven't had since before the pandemic hit - I might go back and pick up some other sizes too. I'm a sucker for good hardware.

Anyhow I did the same thing for the top as I did to the bottom, though I had to pound in a couple finishing nails in first to hold it in place while I drove the screws in. Everything got a good caulk job too.

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By this time I figured the resin from the wood hardener had dried so I mixed up some bondo and applied that over the big craters in the wood. The bondo was pretty runny for some reason and it kept sagging out of the hole. I just kept pushing it back up till it started to set.

DSC00273JPG.jpg

Not my best bondo job ever but at least the holes are filled. A quick sanding and it should be much better. Here again though, it doesn't have to look beautiful as it's going to be covered over with the frame for the screen door. All I did was give the screws something to hold on to. :)

Hopefully I can work on it again tomorrow. The weather is supposed to be iffy again but maybe I can sneak in something. :D

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#542 Space Voyager

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Posted 20 October 2021 - 07:07 AM

Wood hardener?!!?!

:writes it into notes:

I totally knew that was a thing. Posted Image

I hope people at work notice the details, like even covering the screws to make it all perfect. If they don't... WE DO.

#543 Zombie

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Posted 21 October 2021 - 03:40 AM

Only a minor update for today. It rained on and off lightly nearly all afternoon but in between the drops I borrowed a sander from a colleague and sanded the bondo area flat and also lightly sanded the caulked spots from the screws. I even sanded the threshold under the door as it was sticking. That helped, but didn't solve the sticking problem completely. I investigated this a little and found out the screws for the hinges are a little loose. So I'll need to put in some bigger screws to hopefully straighten it out. The windows are also rattling so I'll probably need to reglaze (or in this case, caulk). But that can wait for now. I want to get the outside squared away. :)

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#544 Zombie

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 02:51 AM

So it rained all morning yesterday and part of the afternoon too. Obviously no painting, plus I had to cut flowers which took some time. After that I was free to do whatever I wanted, but we just got in a fairly big basket order and I wanted to get those priced and put away. Got part of it done yesterday and finished up the rest today. Most of the shelves were empty when I started, btw.

DSC00274JPG.jpg

The very top shelf is used for really big baskets or overflow for stuff below. My priority is to get as much of that down below as possible so it's at eye level and accessible. I think I did a good job in that respect as there's just a few bigger baskets above and no overflow. So I'm glad that's done as it makes the place look a little nicer. I still have to put away a supply order we got in the other day (mostly plastic bags for wrapping arrangements and plants when it's cold out). Normally I get this type of order in the second week of November, but with the supply chain problems and costs rising I figured it's better to have this stuff ready just in case. And the last thing I want to do before winter hits is to clean out underneath a couple shelving units along the wall (those wire rack units in some of my pics when I was painting the inside of the back garage door). But those are all rainy day type projects.

Painting must commence as soon as possible as it's getting pretty chilly out now. Posted Image I can sometimes extend the season a bit if the weather cooperates (like it did last year) but that's never a sure thing. Second week of November is usually about as late as I can paint as long as it doesn't rain or frost overnight. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#545 Thorondor

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Posted 23 October 2021 - 03:56 PM

Wow, that's a lot of baskets, Zombie!

Different shapes, sizes and colors. That should cover a nice assortment of customer preferences and specific use cases too I imagine.

Despite the variety I like how you managed to get everything pretty neatly arranged. It may be a rather dense arrangement (no pun intended ;)) given shelving constraints, but it's certainly not messy.

By the way, I think you've actually got it right ordering stuff in advance - this year dalays are likely going to be a thing and prices can only get negatively impacted when that happens. Well played! :)

#546 Zombie

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Posted 27 October 2021 - 03:41 AM

Today was cool and sunny but that's good weather for working outside on a normally hot roof, right? Anyhow, I got out the brown paint and touched up the wood side frame of the door where I caulked and also the edge of the board that faces outside. Then I got out the wall color paint and put a coat on those unsightly green areas from the mistint. Looked a lot better! :)

Then I started work on attaching the outside frame for the screen door. I first did a dry fit just to see if there were any issues. Turns out, yes there was. The new sides are just a tiny bit below the surface of the brick maybe 1/4 inch so trying to attach the new frame on the outside was wobbly, and I was afraid that the space between the side and the outer frame would be too big to make it a secure attachment point. What I needed was a wood spacer about 1/4 inch wide, which I found out in the small garage (we used to use these furring strips to attach the plastic of the greenhouse to the frame with dimensions 1/4" x 1 1/2" x 48"). A lucky find, but they were too wide. How to cut them down to fit the 3/4 inch side would be another obstacle. I ended up using a utility knife to score the wood as deep as I could, then pounding in a flat blade screwdriver and twisting to separate it into two pieces. It wasn't as clean as cutting it, but it doesn't need to look perfect either as it's just a shim. ;)

So I installed the wood shims around the perimeter of the side frame with some wire brads.

DSC00275JPG.jpg DSC00277JPG.jpg

Another dry fit after the shims and the intended result was reached. This should work. The shims are just a tiny bit too thick so the frame doesn't touch the brick anywhere which leaves a gap. I might fill that gap like I did with the sides by using some of those foam pieces as cushioning and crack filling. With these modifications I had to trim down the outer frame sides by a couple inches. Hopefully that doesn't come back to haunt me later. Posted Image

All in all, it's looking up. Fingers crossed that the screen door frame still fits after all this remodeling. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#547 Thorondor

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Posted 27 October 2021 - 11:52 AM

Quite a bit of on-the-fly shoehorning work there, Zombie.

Using a flat blade screwdriver to separate the extra wood is something I expect we've all resorted to at some point to wing it, but what matters in the end is that it gets it done. Without a chisel around a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do. :P

As you imply when there's shaving off on the one hand, then cushioning to compensate on the other it can bite you on the rear if tolerances are too off. I expect the screen door frame will be fine with a little give, but we'll find out soon enough. ;)

#548 Zombie

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Posted 29 October 2021 - 04:13 AM

So the following work happened yesterday - today I was way too busy to get anything done outside. My first priority was to get those foam strips installed around the frame. Luckily they were 3" wide so I was able to cut 3 pieces of 1" wide which was more than enough to fill most of the gap with a little leftover for caulk. Same deal as before - spray adhesive worked great to get the pieces to stick to the brick. I painted the furring strip spacers around the frame after this so that they were protected in the interim. Then I started to work on the outer frame. Predrilled some holes with a countersunk spot for the screw heads and finally remembered to take a quick pic of the progress. Posted Image

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Drove in the screws and the frame is super secure so no worries about the overlap of the frame on the brick. I did the same for the top as I did for the sides though there was a little adjusting that needed to be done. The moment of truth has arrived, time to insert the storm door. Jammed it into the hole for this pic, though it didn't quite fit. :(

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Doesn't look too bad. The width is almost perfect but the frame height is off so the door sticks out at the top. Knew I shouldn't have cut those pieces off the side frame, dagnammit. I should have really taken a picture of the setup before I started work. Oh well. Here's what the upper right part of the storm door looks like.

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The thickness of the storm door's aluminum frame is about an inch and if I cut a strip off the lower part of the top frame (3/4 inch) that means I'll still be short 1/4 inch. I traced around the door on to the frame to give me an idea of what needs to be done.

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Not fully sure about cutting that piece out of the frame. It can be done of course, that isn't a problem. But I'm thinking that the 1/4 inch can be made up by actually removing the furring strip spacer at the top which would allow the door to fit deeper into the frame. Still might need another spacer on the outside, but I haven't tackled the specifics yet. Another dry fit seems to be in order - this time I'm leaving the top frame off to see how much of a difference there is. Posted Image

Oh, and here's something interesting I found out. When I was dry fitting the door I noticed there was some writing on the storm door's aluminum frame. It looks like whoever installed it wrote their initials and date.

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Someone with the initials MS installed it in September 1979. Ok, so that was way before my time as I started work in November 1988. Old bossman is dead so I can't ask him if he knows who it was (he probably would). Current bossman was probably too young to know if it was an employee or a carpenter/contractor as he's baffled. So it's a little mystery, but a cool piece of info as it nails down a date. Not sure what was up there before the storm door was installed, maybe a curved-top wooden door of some sort? I wish there were some early pics of the building. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#549 Thorondor

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Posted 29 October 2021 - 07:41 PM

Things have mostly been going swimmingly, and that first picture is a testament to that, Zombie.

Very competently handled, if a little on the snug side, one wonders looking at the second pic.

But I gotta chuckle at the realization you came to afterwards. Ruh-roh! Posted Image

Your tracing then shows the real extent of the margin needed (little upward sloping of the line there on the very right end side for some reason?).

If you ask me I'd keep it simple and cut that marked segment out of the frame. Beats trying to inch things along by making a number of little compromises all over in the hopes of eventually getting it just right. Improvising solutions is fine, but finer still is leaving the least you can to chance.

Interesting "archaeological" find by the way. MS could be... Mason Storm, or maybe Moses Slats & Co. Must have been divine in the summer of 79. Whatever the case, built to last. Posted Image

#550 Zombie

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Posted 03 November 2021 - 03:23 AM

View PostThorondor, on 29 October 2021 - 07:41 PM, said:

Your tracing then shows the real extent of the margin needed (little upward sloping of the line there on the very right end side for some reason?).

Yeah, the upper right part of the aluminum frame of the storm door stuck up and my fat Sharpie marker couldn't get behind it to make a somewhat straight line. Posted Image

So I continued work on the door a little bit today. I was at least able to address some of the issues and pull it together. Did I mention it was pretty cold today (5C)? Instead of cutting the top part of the frame immediately, I first took it off, then set the storm door in the opening to see if it was even going to be close. It looked okay, so I set the frame above the door loosely to see how much needed to be trimmed off. My tracing seemed to be on target so it should work. The biggest problem I had was cutting the lower part of the frame above the door off. I drilled a big hole at either end and cut it straight with a hand saw. I didn't have a jig saw as it was at home so I had to make a plunge cut with the circular saw. Not my best piece of carpentry but it got the job done.

When I put the storm door back in the opening, I noticed the door was rubbing and sticking on the lower left part of the frame. I ended up taking out all the screws except for the top one, shifting the frame over a little, then driving in the screws again. Problem solved. Put the top part of the frame in place and saw it fit good, so I drove some screws in there too. Before I started attaching the door I wrote my initials and date to the frame on the inside - I might as well continue the tradition, right? :D Anyhow, I found some better screws to use for the outside and reused the stainless steel screws for the hinges.

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The top part of the door was sticking out from the frame yet (the door is about 1 1/4 inches thick while the frame is 3/4 inch thick so about half an inch too thick). I had to go rummaging around in the small garage for something to use and found a cutoff piece of wood I used for the frame. I just cut it to size and sanded the edges and placed it above the door as a dry fit.

DSC00287JPG.jpg

Perfect size for additional framing. Didn't have a chance to prime and paint it yet as I ran out of time. No worries though, I'll do that tomorrow inside and put a fan on it to get it to dry quick. A few screws in that into the frame and a little bit of caulking and I'll finally be ready to put the final coat of paint on it all. Coming together nicely now. And the temps outside are supposed to improve to 10C for the last part of the week which should make caulking and painting a little more comfortable. :)

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#551 Thorondor

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Posted 03 November 2021 - 08:52 PM

Some things do merit preserving for posterity and you know you're deserving of that credit, Zombie. :D

Incidentally, temperatures over here have also taken a bit of a sudden dip, making yesterday's minimum temps become today's maximums, so that should tell you something. ;)

Anyway, given the nice progress you've now reported you shouldn't fear being left out in the cold minding that door for too much longer now, no matter what the thermometer comes to display when you're at it.

#552 Zombie

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Posted 05 November 2021 - 04:23 AM

Just to side step here for a second. Maybe you guys remember that I was going to paint the frame and compressor for the back cooler. Well, I never did obviously, but it was on my mind for a rainy day. Anyhow, the cooler wasn't working a couple weeks ago so we had the refrigeration guys come over to take a look. Turns out the compressor was drawing way too many amps on startup which was blowing fuses and tripping the circuit breaker. Long story short, the whole thing: compressor, blower and condenser were all replaced. Here's what the new unit looks like:

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So far, so good. I've been checking the temp continuously for the last few days and it seems to be holding at the correct value. The main thing is no more blown fuses or tripped circuit breakers. The other day I vacuumed around the new unit to remove the dust and installation debris. It's amazing that this only has one fan (as opposed to two for the old unit) and is probably half the size. It really moves the warm air around though. I used this to my advantage and painted that trim board (one coat of "primer" and one top coat).

dsc00291.jpg

Today I mostly did the caulking around the door. Used up one and a half tubes of caulk and still have a little I need to do yet. I was worried about it drying properly with the chilly temps at night and during the day, but thankfully it warmed up a few degrees today and was sunny. The caulk was actually skinning over between applying it and smoothing it with my finger so I don't think there will be any issues. Once all that caulking was done, I installed that trim board above the door.

dsc00292.jpg dsc00293.jpg

I raised the trim piece about 1/16 of an inch off the door so that there will not be any rubbing going on. It looks like the left side of the door is sticking out from the frame, and you would be correct in pointing that out. I didn't want to close the door completely as the caulk wasn't fully dry around the threshold. In fact, I actually wired the storm door into the open position overnight to hopefully hasten the drying process. If everything dries overnight then I'll probably put the final coat of paint on the frame. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#553 Thorondor

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Posted 05 November 2021 - 04:40 PM

Success, Zombie: Compressor compressed! :P

It sure looks minimalist by comparison with the old unit and it's probably way more efficient consumption-wise.

So, once again you not only talked the talk you caulked the caulk. With profusion. ;)

What really matters here in my book though is how you're taking all the right precautions - for drying/curing, leaving margins for things not to rub and such, yet maintaning insulation ability.

Now take it home, Mr. Smooth Operator! :)

#554 Zombie

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Posted 06 November 2021 - 05:27 AM

Today the weather was a lot nicer than the usual November day. It wasn't super warm or anything, in fact it was a tad chilly without a jacket but I'm not complaining. In the morning and early afternoon I had a few emergency projects I had to complete. After that it was all systems go for painting.

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Looks very nice now. Still have to cut in with the wall color around the frame but that shouldn't take too long. And yes, I wired the storm door open again even though it was pretty much dry. The next project is to work on the window next to the door. It's not in terrible shape as it was replaced a few years ago... still needs some TLC as it's starting to go downhill. I started on that by scraping and sanding the sill plate, The caulk underneath the white frame was loose in areas so I made the executive decision to rip it all out and start from scratch. Glad I did because there was silicone caulk underneath the acrylic caulk. Nothing wrong with this normally, but the silicone caulk was starting to peel up a little so I didn't want to chance it.

dsc00295.jpg

And the cream colored frame below the white is not actually wood. No siree, it's some kind of compressed fiber board. What the hell, can't people use actual wood anymore? That fiberboard stuff just soaks up water like a sponge when it's outdoors. Well, this stuff wasn't completely falling apart it was just a little warped so I decided to keep it. The warped areas needed to be fixed so I pounded in some 2" finishing nails which stiffened things up.

dsc00296.jpg

So I'm still not sure I want this stuff outside. I might take a rummage around in the garage. A few years ago when I put the molding around the back garage door I know I had some leftover. Not sure how much, but maybe it'll be enough for the window. I need to check on that tomorrow. ;)

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#555 Thorondor

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Posted 06 November 2021 - 04:31 PM

That's fancy with milk chocolate right there, Zombie. :)

Turned out great. With your paint job it becomes invisible to the eye just how much doing it took "under the hood" to bring it all together in this fashion. The very hallmark of a job well done.

Liking your approach to the window too - hiding stuff (silicone caulk / acrylic caulk business) under the proverbial rug would just be asking for trouble. Dealing with it now before you're forced to handle it in worse weather is indeed the ticket.

Fully replacing that degrading pseudo-wood board may be taking it "all in" a tad much, but I guess it all hinges on you having a substitute handy or not. Otherwise, insulate and tempt fate? ;)

#556 Zombie

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Posted 08 November 2021 - 02:59 AM

View PostThorondor, on 06 November 2021 - 04:31 PM, said:

Fully replacing that degrading pseudo-wood board may be taking it "all in" a tad much, but I guess it all hinges on you having a substitute handy or not. Otherwise, insulate and tempt fate? Posted Image

Replacing a cheap board that's starting to show some degradation is certainly not taking it too far. I mean, if it goes to pot in a couple years I'll end up replacing it anyway. Doesn't really matter in this case as the molding I had in the garage was a little bit too tall and too thick. I could probably make it work but it's not worth the effort.

So I was at work today doing some delivery, parking lot cleanup (leaves from the trees make a mess and there were some weeds that needed to be removed before winter) and bleaching buckets, but did have a chance to mess around with the window for a little bit. First priority was to carefully remove the old brick molding from around the window. There was a lot of caulk holding it in place (besides the few rusted out finishing nails) so I had to scrape that loose first. The reason why I did this carefully was so that I could take an accurate measurement for the new PVC molding. Once the molding was off, I removed the old nails, scraped some more and painted the frame underneath (I'm always amazed this never gets done, probably because carpenters are not painters).

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There's a pretty big space between the window casing and the brick. There are 5 options to address this:
  • Caulk - but it would take a fair whack of it in multiple "coats" to fill that up properly.
  • Bondo - certainly an option though it's messy and would be on the pricier side.
  • Water Putty - another option, cheaper than bondo and less messy but has issues sticking in place if water gets behind.
  • Great Stuff expanding foam - probably the quickest fix. Doesn't have issues with water because the space will be filled completely. Can't drive nails or screws into it as it will not hold.
  • Do nothing? Fill with poly fiberfill? Cheapest, but doesn't fix anything and you run the risk of making the wood decay faster.
I'm thinking Great Stuff. Don't have any on hand currently, but I need to go to the hardware store anyway for finishing nails. ;)

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#557 Thorondor

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Posted 08 November 2021 - 08:54 PM

Repairs you want not too cheap. Besides, with Zombie you're top of the heap! Posted Image

Plenty of wood spent on the door frame already is all I was hinting at. So, true full replacement fix or... "camouflage" repair work it is. Posted Image

On the Window front, you're reaching new heights in gap filling. The options, as presented, have me leaning towards your favoured candidate.

Only expected potential downside is toxicity - if that expanding foam is like some we've got here it can mess with your throat, even outdoors.

Thy call!

#558 Zombie

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Posted 09 November 2021 - 02:18 PM

View PostThorondor, on 08 November 2021 - 08:54 PM, said:

Only expected potential downside is toxicity - if that expanding foam is like some we've got here it can mess with your throat, even outdoors.

Your expanding foams might have a different formulation or ingredients as I've never had any issues with smells or burning with Great Stuff. If I'm standing at a normal distance away I don't smell anything tbh. If I was right up next to it with my nose in the stuff, then maybe. But I never get that close to the foam when I'm working with it as it's difficult to clean up if you get it on you. Posted Image

So yeah, I ended up going the foam route. Seemed to do a good job filling in all the big cracks and voids,

dsc00298.jpg

You can't really see it, but the crack at the lower left was about 1 1/2 inches wide and the foam didn't bat an eye filling that up with just expansion. :)

Oh, and here's a piece of advice for cleanup. Read the directions on the can first for what will work, and do not start any filling without having that solvent on hand and nearby. Once the foam dries, you have to mechanically remove it from your skin or let it fall off naturally neither of which are nice. On the Great Stuff can it says acetone will remove it when uncured. Now, I didn't have any acetone, but I do have lacquer thinner which contains acetone and it worked fine. And if you want to stand a chance of using the rest of the can at a later date, stick the straw, nozzle and spray orifice directly into the solvent ASAP. Acetone works surprisingly quick and painless to remove all of the residual foam in those parts. Just an FYI. Posted Image

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#559 Space Voyager

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Posted 09 November 2021 - 02:24 PM

If you buy the foam cleaning spray you just twist the straw onto it and spray it through. Quite handy. Bought it and only used it once... :D Otherwise I noticed that the foam is easiest to clean if you let it dry completely. If you start removing it pronto, you better have that solvent ready, true. Though if it falls on parquet, I wouldn't recommend solvents.

#560 Thorondor

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Posted 09 November 2021 - 05:33 PM

Haven't needed to use such foam in a good while so it's quite possible there are variants that are less offensive to your airways now.

Last time I dabbled with it not much thought was given to cleanup as throw-away gloves were at hand and the can was expected to be used in its entirety.

Still, nice to know tips from both of you - thanks! Posted Image




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