Let's Paint!


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#21 Thorondor

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 02:50 PM

To paint or not to paint - that is the question, Zombie! Posted Image

You're clearly on a roll. No project too big.

Since you're feeling the drive to get things done, I'd say go the distance. You know those square nuts should really be replaced as they'll inevitably just come loose again.

Pretending otherwise is but a delay tactic. Perfectly acceptable, of course, even if you know it will drive you up the wall again next time.

Sooo, might as well go nuts now? Posted Image

#22 Zombie

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:48 AM

Undertaking a complete swap of square to hex nuts isn't hard, just time consuming and it'll cost some $ too because I'll need over 112 nuts and lockwashers (28 nuts per row ×  4 rows). The cost of the materials will probably come to under $20 which isn't huge, the problem is the time it'll take me. I'll have to run it past bossman first to make sure he understands the issue. I also don't know offhand whether the bolts are long enough to accommodate a lockwasher (I have some nuts and lockwashers on hand to check though). Swapping out the bolts would really be an issue as I could foresee problems arising which may make it cost prohibitive. On the other hand, I might be able to use threadlock liquid to prevent the nuts from loosening up so worst case I could employ that in case lockwashers would not work.Happy, happy, joy, joy! Posted Image



And this is only fitting:

http://youtu.be/2xDkgHy0p6g?t=152

Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#23 Zombie

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 05:01 AM

Another busy day at work. However, I was able to prime the garage door in-between projects (I'm using that premium latex primer). Finally a nearly full view of it:

2018-07-16 17.01.jpg

I didn't prime the whole thing, just the parts where there wasn't any paint (or very little), so that's why it looks spotty in areas. It also may look a little shiny in spots, that's because the paint did not dry fully when the pic was taken. At the upper left you can really see how yellow the old paint has become over the years. The only thing I used was a 3" brush (I should have used a throwaway as the primer kinda gummed up my good brush but I should be able to get it clean after soaking overnight). The only part I didn't finish was the frame around the windows, that's going to require a different brush (2" angled sash brush), and a very steady hand (going to freehand it - no taping). Posted Image Here's another pic, this time a close up (sorta):

2018-07-16 17.00.jpg

You can see that the lower part of the panes on the last row have some yellow lines. This isn't from a too-thin layer of paint, it comes from water stains (and possibly tannins in the wood) bleeding through the primer (tannins and water stains are soluble in latex primer and discolor it, usually yellow or brown). I knew this would be an issue, but painting it with a latex primer first allows you to see what areas need to be addressed. I can spot prime those problem areas with a fast drying alcohol based primer later (it's probably closer to a shellac than a primer, but has lots of pigment in it to prevent bleed through). After that, I can touch up those spots with another light coat of latex primer and the whole thing should be ready for the final coat. In the meantime, it at least looks decent. Posted Image

I didn't do anything with the square nuts. As I'll still be priming (and because it covers decently) I can swap out nuts up till I apply the top coat. Lockwashers will fit but it might be close on some bolts. I miscounted the quantity I'd need too - there are actually 5 rows of 28 nuts so that comes to 140. I might have 40 extra nuts and lockwashers so then I'd only need a box of 100 for each, though I need to count it out carefully as I want some on-hand to use when I need to fix something. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#24 Space Voyager

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 05:55 AM

Have you tried using a roller? The door seems to have quite some area that could be painted much faster with it. I try to use it whenever possible as brushes are a pain in the arm...

#25 Thorondor

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 09:43 AM

Very informative explanation about the potential origins of the staining there, Zombie. :)

And I see you like extra challenge: painting the frame around the windows freehand, without taping - you daredevil you! :D

Obligatory nuts joke: it's going to be tight! :P

#26 Zombie

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 02:53 PM

View PostSpace Voyager, on 17 July 2018 - 05:55 AM, said:

Have you tried using a roller? The door seems to have quite some area that could be painted much faster with it. I try to use it whenever possible as brushes are a pain in the arm...

I rarely if ever use a roller for a prime coat (unless it's like a ceiling or wall or floor). In the case of this garage door, there are way too many intricate areas (hinges, springs, metal bars) that need to be brushed anyway. The few areas on the flat panels that need primer can be done by brush pretty quick. For the areas that don't have any paint on them, it's very difficult to achieve opaqueness with a roller - the coat is always too thin. With a brush, you can "float" a layer of paint on those areas and achieve near total concealment (there will be some light brushmarks though). Also, when you use a roller for priming there's the possibility you'll pull up flaps of paint and deposit them elsewhere. That will show on the final coat. So could I have used a roller for the prime coat? Well, sure. You just have to weigh the pros and the cons and go from there. Now for the final coat, I'll probably use a roller for the panels as coverage will not matter and you can achieve better looking results with a roller due to the lack of brushmarks. Posted Image

View PostThorondor, on 17 July 2018 - 09:43 AM, said:

And I see you like extra challenge: painting the frame around the windows freehand, without taping - you daredevil you! Posted Image

Thing is, taping takes a considerable amount of time. By the time I tape everything up I could have had it painted already. You just have to take your time and be careful. For the top part of the frame I might just tape that as it'll be easier to maneuver the brush in there without getting paint on the windows. Posted Image (IE, gravity will be working with me for the sides and bottom, but against me on the top. Hope that makes sense).

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#27 Zombie

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 06:56 AM

I worked a little more on the garage door the last couple days and I think I'm done with the prep and priming. Yesterday I taped up the top part of the windows and got a coat of primer on the muntin bars (the strips of wood that hold in the glass... in this case, polycarbonate. And I don't mean mutton bars or Muton bars either Posted Image). After that, I went to the hardware store to get some stain blocking primer (for the water stains) as I just had a little bit left in my two cans. You can get the stuff in a quart can, but I found it is a little bit easier to get it in a spray paint can as you don't have to worry about cleaning up a brush. So I sprayed those water stained areas and it looked much better. Since I was on the ground I put another coat of latex primer on the lower row of panels, the hinges and metal bars (as high as I could reach anyway). Today I put another coat of primer on the muntin bars and touched up the stuff I couldn't reach yesterday. Here's a pic of what it looks like currently:

2018-07-18 154921.jpg

Not sure if I'm going to prime the panels as most appear to be in sound shape now. And I don't think I'm going to mess with replacing those square nuts either, I socked enough primer on the nuts and ends of the bolts that they probably can't loosen up anymore. Posted Image

Here's a pic of the two items I used:

2018-07-18 155046.jpg

The stain blocking primer (on the right) is from Zinsser and is ~$5 usd for a spray can. It's not a shellac based paint. There is a shellac based primer from the same company called B-I-N and that's  ~$10 usd. I got a can of both and tried them out. The BIN was great, you just have to remember to shake up the can a ton as the pigment really settles out fast. The Bulls Eye also worked great. It covered the water stains just fine so I might opt for that in the future as it's cheaper than the BIN and is also listed as Indoor/Outdoor which makes it more versatile. Posted Image

Now you are probably wondering what that orange bottle is. Well, the short of it is to condition latex paint. Here's the deal, I swear by the stuff. I normally use excellent paint for all my paint jobs, the only issue being is that the paint is usually exceptionally thick. You need paint that's thick so it covers decent. Most people will just add water to thin a thick latex paint down. The issue with that is the paint is now diluted and doesn't dry very good. The conditioner contains the base (or carrier) of actual latex paint plus some other additives. This thins the paint without diluting it. Mix a few tablespoons of the stuff in a gallon of paint, stir, and the consistency is just like cream. Now when you apply the paint, you virtually eliminate brush and roller marks and on top of that it helps the paint dry better in humid conditions. Let's say you are painting out of a can. If the can is open for a long time the paint can get a little too thick. Well, put some conditioner in it and it's like new again. There's a ton of benefits.

The same company also makes a conditioner for oil based paints as well. I do use this sometimes for oil paint that is "stringy" when you roll it. Mix some of that in the paint and there's no stringyness and you don't have those unsightly brush and roller marks anymore either. Posted Image

Since I'm just about done with the back garage door, I started work on another garage door which is peeling heavily. So far, so good. When that's fully scraped I'll take a pic of it too. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#28 Thorondor

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 03:03 PM

No need to shy away from the spray, eh, Zombie? Posted Image

And them muntin bars are lookin' right fine, podnah! Posted Image

Appreciate the tips on that conditioner use as that can really make a difference, not having to worry about covering up brush marks, all without compromising paint quality or drying time.

Well, I see you're feeling outright unstoppable, already eyeing another garage door. The show must go on! Posted Image

#29 Zombie

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 06:20 AM

The garage door I'm currently working on is the one you can see in a previous picture with the rolling tables. Here's a link to the post (the first pic with a table in it). Anyhow, the frames around the panels were peeling a little bit so I scraped those off first. While I was scraping the frames I noticed that the panels may have loosened up at one time as the paint was cracked along the edges. I can't have any loose paint so the edges were scraped. When I was using the putty knife to get some of the loose paint off, I lightly scraped against one of the panels and a big flap of paint appeared. I started pulling and next thing I knew the whole panel was completely devoid of paint. In fact, it looked brand new underneath. And that was just the beginning. Eight more panels did the same thing. Here's what the top looked like:

2018-07-19 170812.jpg

The bottom panels were holding decent so I didn't muck with them for fear of making anything worse. No pics of the bottom as there was nothing really to see.

Now, I painted this garage door, so it's baffling how the paint peeled off so easily from the panels. You try to remember: "did I use a primer?" or "maybe I just slapped on a bunch of top coats" or "maybe I used a crappy primer" and to be quite honest, I don't remember anymore (it was nearly 15 years ago when I painted it).

So now what? The panels are made out of hardboard (aka HDF... High Density Fiberboard). While I was just reading the wiki article to make sure this was what I had, I noticed that there is a type called tempered hardboard which is normal hardboard treated with linseed oil and baked to make it stronger, tougher, harder. Had I known this earlier today, I would have treated the panels with some linseed oil, but oh well. Posted Image

Obviously, whatever paint was on the panels didn't stick properly. That high quality latex primer I've been using was my first choice as it'll stick to just about anything (including ceramic tile and even glass). If it'll stick to glass, it'll certainly stick to HDF. But, I still had doubts about latex. I wanted something that would soak in and create a uniform bond. I ended up using an oil based primer from the same company since I had some left from a project last year. Here's a pic of the door primed:

2018-07-20 170018.jpg

I know, I know, it's brown. In a perfect world, I'd have a white primer, but beggars can't be choosers. When I opened up the half-full can, I was amazed. The paint had settled out, but after stirring the thing looked like the day I purchased it. The only thing I added to it last year was some oil paint conditioner (this is from the same company-"Flood" as the latex stuff but it's called Penetrol) and possibly a little turpentine. Not much of either I imagine as I wanted it to dry a little slower (Penetrol) and soak in easier (turpentine). So I experimented by applying this primer to one panel as a test. It soaked in and dried decently so the whole door got this treatment. Needless to say, I'm pretty confident I chose the correct primer for the job. Posted Image

More to come! Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#30 Thorondor

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 02:18 PM

Whatever you applied to those hardboard panels actually did the trick just fine, Zombie, even if it didn't adhere as well as it was supposed to.

We keep judging paint jobs from an aesthetic point of view but what they're truly meant to do is protect the material it's being applied on. And, on that count, as can be seen in the picture you took, it absolutely did keep that wood in pretty much pristine condition.

As for that oil based primer, yeah, it's kind of hard to overlook how richly brown it is. Posted Image

Still, I'm sure you'll overcome the challenge of covering it easily enough by laying a nice, thick coat, of fancy white paint on top of it.

The thing is, fifteen years from now, when you decide that door needs scraping again, you'll once more catch yourself scratching your head wondering whose bright idea was it to put a brown primer underneath white paint. Posted Image

#31 Zombie

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 03:48 AM

View PostThorondor, on 21 July 2018 - 02:18 PM, said:

Whatever you applied to those hardboard panels actually did the trick just fine, Zombie, even if it didn't adhere as well as it was supposed to.

We keep judging paint jobs from an aesthetic point of view but what they're truly meant to do is protect the material it's being applied on. And, on that count, as can be seen in the picture you took, it absolutely did keep that wood in pretty much pristine condition.

I think those panels were fine even before I painted them years ago. The reason I painted them was to make it look better and to brighten up the room (so basically aesthetics). What protects the inside more was my careful maintenance of the outside of the door which takes the full brunt of scorching sun in the summer and snow in the winter. I touched up the outside almost every other year.

View PostThorondor, on 21 July 2018 - 02:18 PM, said:

As for that oil based primer, yeah, it's kind of hard to overlook how richly brown it is. Posted Image

Still, I'm sure you'll overcome the challenge of covering it easily enough by laying a nice, thick coat, of fancy white paint on top of it.

The thing is, fifteen years from now, when you decide that door needs scraping again, you'll once more catch yourself scratching your head wondering whose bright idea was it to put a brown primer underneath white paint. Posted Image

Hopefully I will not be around there in 15 years to worry about it. Though the next guy will certainly have a fun surprise. Posted Image

Here's a pic of the lower part of the door just for reference:

2018-07-20 170028.jpg

First of all, when I paint I usually cover things up with cardboard. That's one thing we have an overabundance of at work. I don't care how clean of a painter you think you are either, you are always going to make a mess. I try to keep the drips and splatter to a minimum though. Anyway the panel on the lower right I replaced a while ago but never got around to painting it. It had some sort of paint on it, but it was partially soaked away on the lower part so I primed the whole panel. The molding which holds in the panel will need to be caulked as well.

With the majority of the door primed, I turned my attention to the muntin bars around the windows. The bottom ones looked like they were a little loose and were peeling heavily. I made the executive decision to carefully remove them. I put these bars on the last time and used some tiny brad nails about ¾ inch long. I've found the best way to remove the bars is to ignore trying to get the nails to come along with the piece. Carefully pry the bars up and the nail heads should pull through the molding and stick in the frame. How to get the nails out of the frame? Easiest way is to grab them with a Vise-Grip (or locking pliers) and they pull right out with a little twisting. There's no sense in keeping the nails either - just toss them and use new ones.

Now that the bars were off, I could sand them with some 50 grit sandpaper to remove the majority of the loose paint then went over that with 80 grit to smooth things out. After that, there was hardly any paint on them anymore so I decided to use the same brown oil primer on them for protection. Here's where it get's tricky. How do you paint the whole bar and have it dry without it sticking to something? My favorite option (if the piece has a hole in it) is to take a piece of wire and stick it through the hole, paint the piece, then hang it up to dry on the wire. Because the bars are small, it's hard to grip them while painting so I opted for lightly putting a drywall screw into one of the brad holes at the end of the bar, then wrapping a wire around the screw. Hard to explain, maybe a pic or two will do:

2018-07-20 170227.jpg 2018-07-20 170242.jpg

That was the aftermath of my handiwork - the bars look pretty good. Oh, but I was not finished! The same treatment I did to the bars I also did to the lower part of the frame where the bars nail to. Scraped, sanded with 50 grit, wire brushed, 80 grit, and finally brown oil primer. It all dried splendidly before I left work yesterday.

Today I decided to spray the bars with some of that bullseye 1-2-3 stain blocking primer as these bars got wet from rain seeping in around the windows and undoubtedly had some water stains. Perhaps the brown oil primer would have been good enough to block water stains but I need the bars white eventually so I figured I might as well hit them with bullseye. That 30 minute dry time is a good sell as the bars were dry before I even had a chance to put the cap back on the spray can. Posted Image

I also took off the side muntin bars as there were a few that looked loose and yeah, they were peeling a little too. Here again, these got the same treatment as before with the scraping, sanding, wire brushing and primer. Ditto for the frame. The bars didn't dry as fast as I would have liked (probably because I put on a heavy coat) so I tried to speed the drying along with a heat gun. While that did work, I didn't want to chance putting on a coat of bullseye with the brown primer possibly still a little wet underneath. That'll have to wait till Monday. Posted Image

While painting the side frame today I noticed that some of the polycarbonate glass panes were loose in the frame. I did use glazing on the windows when I replaced them years ago, but it looks like that glazing has dried up and pulled away from the windows. To really do a proper job I would need to take the last muntin bar out, scrape all the old glazing off, reprime the frame, apply new glazing, put the window back in and reattach the bars. Then I got to thinking. Why bother doing all that work only to use the same old, yellow, opaque polycarbonate glass? I ran it past Mr Bossman and got the approval for 3 new panes of crystal clear Lexan. Now I can do a proper job! Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#32 Thorondor

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 02:20 PM

Zombie declares: "Hang 'em all!" ;)

That was a good call. Looks like the bars turned out just fine and all the more so since you didn't cut any corners, what with the proper sanding, wire brushing and leaving no stone unturned - whatever needed attention got it.

And I couldn't agree more with the preemptive covering of nearby surfaces. Paint always seems to find a way to drip somewhere while you've gone on to the next area, or you inadvertently brush up against yet undry paint which then gets spread around to the whatever else you touch. Soon it's like being back to kindergarten all over again. :P

You clearly put in the effort all the way, so it's only fitting upper management listened to your recommendation to splurge a little, greenlighting those new panes. :cool:

#33 Zombie

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 04:16 AM

Today I was able to spray a couple light coats of that stain blocking primer on the side muntin bars. Those dried almost instantly and they look really good now. No pics of them yet I'll provide one maybe tomorrow.

With that little project out of the way I moved on to the garage door itself. We left off with a brown oil primer on the top panels and parts of the frame. Let's hide that with a coat of white latex primer:

2018-07-23 164112.jpg

It's not perfect as you can still see hints of the brown primer underneath but it's at least not as noticeable anymore. How did I apply it? With my trusty 3" latex brush. For the bottom part of the garage door, I first caulked anything that resembled a crack Posted Image and let that dry for about 30 minutes. Once it skinned over I was able to prime the lower part:

2018-07-23 164125.jpg

Much better. The day was not over yet, so I decided to take off the top muntin bars from the windows (leaving the windows without anything to hold them in besides the decaying glazing). As before, they got the usual scraping, sanding, brushing, sanding, dusting and priming. Then the top part of the frame where the muntin bars fit was primed also.

But there was one problem: the windows were not very secure in the frame due to no muntin bars anymore. Can't just leave that the way it is overnight, someone could push the glass and get right inside. So I cut some pieces of wood and nailed them in place as temporary muntin bars (you might be able to see them from the pics - I had a hard time getting a clear shot due to it being so bright). Now that the windows are secure I can breathe a little easier. Posted Image

So what's going to happen tomorrow? If I have the time, I want to spray the top muntin bars with that white stain blocking primer so that all the bars will be ready to go. I'm running a little low on primer now so I need to stop by the paint store to get both types (might have them tone down the brown to maybe a tan or something, ahem). Posted Image I also need a topcoat paint for both garage doors. I want to use an exterior paint on the inside due to occasional water infiltration, and I want it to be somewhat glossy. Exterior and gloss are two words that do not go together - maybe I can get it in an eggshell or semi-gloss finish instead. I'll have to run that past the pros to see what they recommend. And of course I need to order the three new panes of Lexan. :)

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#34 Zombie

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 03:59 AM

So I sprayed the last three muntin bars with stain blocking primer today and now all of them are done:

2018-07-24 165843.jpg

Just about the only thing left to do is to fill in the nail holes. They really turned out nice! Posted Image

I had some time before work this morning so I stopped by the paint store. Picked up another gallon of that premium latex primer, and also a gallon of that oil primer - this time tinted to a light tan. It wasn't the color I was expecting as I was after a 1/3 formula tint instead of the 1/2 formula tint (which was the dark brown color). Turns out the guy used a different (lighter) formula and then added 1/3 of that tint mix to the primer. So now it's pretty light, but I can still work with it. Posted Image

What I settled on for a top coat for the garage doors was a semi-gloss exterior latex paint in pure white. I'm not a fan of painting with semi-gloss as it has a tendency to get "stringy" when rolling and it highlights any imperfections, so I'm going to tone down the stringy characteristic with some of that latex paint additive (which should also help prolong the dry time) and after the door is painted I'll turn on a fan to keep the humidity down. As for dealing with imperfections, I'm pretty confident that the back door is smooth enough now and the other one is getting there. Posted Image

While at the paint store I also picked up a spray can of their own brand of white stain blocking primer. I actually used the same type of paint before just in a gallon which worked good so I figured I'd give this a shot. The biggest plus was it's price: $4 usd. I had to try it out today and it's ok... light on the pigment and it's a strange yellow-ish color (even after shaking to 5+ minutes) but it dries fast though which means you can respray any areas almost immediately.

Yesterday we had the back garage door open for some ventilation and when I went back there today to look at it, there were cracks in the primer where the panels meet the frame. I know these panels are meant to "float" in the frame loose, but that's bad news for a good paint job. To combat this, I caulked all those joints today with an excellent white caulk that really stretches. Hopefully the caulk will prevent any more cracks by still allowing the panel to move a little.

With all that caulking finished, I touched up a few spots on the back door where there was water stains peeking through yet. I then applied another coat of primer to the top panels of the other garage door:

2018-07-24 165645.jpg

I only had a little bit of primer left in the can though. The garage door was in full sun at this time and the paint was almost insta-drying on the panels which was not good. So because of the fast drying I added a good swig of the latex paint conditioner to the can and stirred it up well. I just barely had enough to finish the top part of the door down to the frame below the windows. For the rest, I'll have to pop open that new can. Wish I could have finished all the priming today, but at least there isn't much left to do and the job looks decent enough. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#35 Thorondor

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 11:17 AM

Looks decent enough, he says. Very modest of you, Zombie. :)

The issues you mention of the appearance of cracks and direct exposure to the sun significantly affecting drying times are, obviously, the bread and butter of dealing with wood of different sorts - one can never quite anticipate how much paint a certain kind soaks or how much the material gives at any given time.

As it is, it's already quite an improvement from the initial state that door was in.

#36 Zombie

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 03:54 AM

I was pretty busy yesterday doing other things at work so I didn't have any time to paint. And I didn't want to start removing the windows as it was supposed to storm late in the evening. I'm glad I did wait as it rained heavily. Today was a completely different story: beautiful weather, nice breeze, low humidity. Perfect for painting but unfortunately somewhat busy again. In between projects I was able to work on the windows.

I started by carefully removing all the panes. Then the lengthy process of scraping off all the old glazing from the frame began. The glazing was pretty hard so it took a while to pry it away from the frame. All of it had to go, every last piece as I need to have a clean flat surface to mount the new panes and also I wanted to make sure I had the proper measurements. When most of the glazing was removed, I started to sand. This is where I found out that the rain we had managed to get between the glazing and window and soak the wood. What a mess, the wood was really damp and wet so I had to be careful to not gouge anything. As it was, just the process of lightly scraping raised the grain of the wood in areas causing it to shred. To get rid of that I sanded, and sanded and sanded using a light touch, and determining which direction to was best (I had to use a circular motion to remove the shreds, with the grain to the right on the inside and with the grain to the left for the molding on the outside). I still didn't get it all off, but the inside is at least tolerable. When the wood dries more I'll be able to sand easier.

After the sanding headache, I lightly scraped the edge of the molding to remove any old paint or caulk as I needed a perfect 90° corner for the window to fit without any spaces - kinda important to get things just right as you don't want to have giant gaps anywhere as it looks bad when you are done and also you'll end up using more glazing compound to fix those imperfections. Then it was a light sanding to get the edge just right. All that scraping highlighted other areas on the molding and outside frame of the garage door where there was loose paint. More scraping took place on those parts.

The final step was to double check my measurements, scrape the old panes to remove as much glazing as possible and then reinstall the old windows with the temporary muntin bars. It's going to have to stay like this for a while because I need the wood to be dry in order to prime with that oil paint. With the lower humidity and baking afternoon sun hopefully it will not take too long. Pic of the windows from the outside this time:

2018-07-26_164001.jpg

It doesn't look like much was done, but you can see the lower molding is basically free from paint now.

Depending on weather, I might forego painting the inside and just focus on the outside of the door for a while. A lot of it needs scraping and after the scraping it needs priming. You don't want to be applying primer after you installed new window panes as cleanup would be be nearly impossible on Lexan or plexiglass. Oh the joys of replacing window panes, it always evolves into a bigger project. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#37 Thorondor

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 09:15 AM

Quote

Miyagi: Hai! [makes circular gestures with each hand]

Miyagi: Wax on, right hand. Wax off, left hand. Wax on, wax off. Breathe in through nose, out the mouth. Wax on, wax off. Don't forget to breathe, very important.

[walks away, still making circular motions with hands]

Miyagi: Wax on, wax off. Wax on, wax off.
- Karate Kid motion picture, 1984

It's all in the wrist, right, Zombie? Posted Image

Scraping, sanding, priming. But joys indeed: those of a job well done, when you go through all the required motions without cutting any corners.

Now that's a lesson worth teaching.

#38 Zombie

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 01:08 AM

It's been a busy week at work which didn't give me much time to get a lot of painting done and I'm usually able to fit something in when time permits. Friday was a bit more relaxing and the weather was cooperating so I went to town scraping the outside of the garage door. It didn't need too much attention - basically it was just the frame and the interface between the panels and the frame (I caulked the lower section last year so they were fine, but the top panels had some loose caulk and peeling paint around the molding.

2018-07-27 163307.jpg 2018-07-27 163344.jpg

I swept up and had a few small dustpans full of paint chips so something got done (you can see those two items on the right of the first pic, on the left is a wood 6 foot ladder and a fiberglass 8 foot ladder). It's a little hard to see, but in the second pic you might be able to pick out hints of red on the right part of the molding around the window. Yup, the molding used to be red ages ago. Of course, back then the garage door was the color of the building (that light caramel color) so the red actually stood out. I changed the color of the door to a brown to match the gutters years ago so now the red wouldn't show up as good... so I'm gonna keep the molding brown. Posted Image

You might be able to see that the gasket at the bottom of the door is a little chewed up. It seemed ok when I started but I might have nicked it with the ladder. No worries though, it's been ages since I put a new gasket on it so it's probably time to replace anyway. They are pretty cheap and doesn't take much time to install so it's a win-win. Posted Image

The weather was excellent this weekend, so assuming it stays decent, I'm going to apply some wood preservative+linseed oil mix to the bare spots and then hopefully put a quick coat of primer on the door tomorrow. After that dries I need to caulk around the panels, but after that I can start painting the outside. Little by little, I'll get it done. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#39 Thorondor

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 08:52 AM

All competently scraped and ready to be taken to the next stage by the looks of it, Zombie.

As for the prior color the molding once had, I doubt you'll be caught red-handed covering that up given it's pretty subtle. ;)

#40 Space Voyager

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 06:50 AM

Ha, great work on that hanging! I usually take the risk of sticking and reduce it by letting stuff dry over... can't find the expression... drying stands?




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