Let's Paint!


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#161 Thorondor

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 02:58 PM

If you can contain and maintain for another decade, Zombie - and your dedication made me a believer - I'll give you a free pass on the sill plate. ;)

So, your ever roaming keen eye spotted decaying mortar joints, but I see you got to the bottom of it all pretty quick. Crummy metal really is our bane, this time a gutter spike. Just think of the cascading costs that result from it. :bleh:

Service door: not bad he says? That red is now far from dead! Though I can imagine opening that door only to find the contrasting tones, outside and in, rather odd. :P

#162 Zombie

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 04:18 AM

View PostThorondor, on 11 August 2019 - 02:58 PM, said:

Service door: not bad he says? That red is now far from dead! Though I can imagine opening that door only to find the contrasting tones, outside and in, rather odd. Posted Image

True, though that's the color scheme on the outside so it's just easier to follow that indoors too. Besides, in case of fire I'd much rather have the door a nice bright red to make it easier to spot. Posted Image

Since I have the door painted properly it would be stupid not to do the windows too, right? I actually found an old can of red from 2012 marked "For Windows", but it was pretty thinned out to work as a base coat. I ended up mixing that with the remainder of the door paint and then it was good to go. So here's the before picture (with screens inserted):

DSC09704JPG.jpg

The windows are pretty washed out but thankfully there's not too much rust. First thing is to get the screens out, then clean out the track they go in which collects all sorts of crap like dust, dirt, dead insects etc. I usually tape off the window glass to make cleanup easier, but in this case I have a somewhat decent brush so I decided to just freehand it. I only made a couple mistakes which were easily fixed with a rag with a little paint thinner on it (using an oil paint btw). Here's the after pic, with screens removed:

DSC09705JPG.jpg

There's a spot on the lower left of the frame which I missed when this pic was taken but it was touched up soon after (there's 4 windows in total). I painted all the screen frames and I think I have 2 coats on them right now. The only thing left to do is put another coat on all the windows, screen frames and doors (2 of these) so they all match. Got another quart from the paint store which should be enough for a final coat on everything plus a little extra for touch-ups.

Today I primed all those raw mortar joints which I tuck pointed a while back. Everything looked dry and cured and the mortar didn't crumble when I ran a rough stone over the joints to remove the high spots. Unfortunately I found another area near the downspout where the mortar was crumbling underneath the paint so out came the hammer and flat blade screwdriver to dig them out.

DSC09706JPG.jpg

I'll have to do a little more tuck pointing then. Not a big issue, the biggest problem is waiting for the joints to cure as I want to paint it already. :P Luckily when I was at the paint store I was able to pick up a gallon of mis-tinted paint for $3 which is the same sheen and type as I normally use, plus it was pretty close to the color. I rarely if ever see mis-tints for flat exterior paint so this was a great find. I'll use this as a base coat, then go over that with the final color and Bob's your auntie. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#163 Space Voyager

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 05:45 AM

Yes, sure, it is stupid not to do some more work after doing a lot of it already.

Posted Image

;)

Damn, Zombie, you're unstoppable. The only work I actually did was to prolongue the life of an outside table (with attached benches) by sanding and paiting it. I left the poor table to the elements for too long already and it was either buying a new one (400€) or investing some work and money (cca. 50€). Which I did. I'll post that but first I have to decide for a new provider of web space for pics. I know I can upload them here but still, I like having the pics in one place. Photobucket is suddenly acting up on me and if you look at my AARs, the pics are ruined by watermarks etc. to push me into a monthly subscription.

#164 Thorondor

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 11:36 AM

Yep, there's no worrying where the paint may land when Zombie decides to freehand! Posted Image

Those windows seem to have some tough to reach spots on the inside, namely on corners, hinges and the midpoint connections, but you've managed alright by the looks of it.

Otherwise, pout as one may at the trouble by the downspout, things are well underway and you'll soon be out and about painting that wall anyway! Posted Image

#165 Zombie

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 01:43 AM

View PostThorondor, on 21 August 2019 - 11:36 AM, said:

Yep, there's no worrying where the paint may land when Zombie decides to freehand! Posted Image

I splattered a little bit down the wall underneath a couple of the windows which I noticed today. But I gotta paint it anyway so... Freehanding can be really challenging especially with a so-so brush. A pro tip would be to bite the bullet and purchase a decent brush because that makes cutting in around the frame so much easier.

View PostThorondor, on 21 August 2019 - 11:36 AM, said:

Those windows seem to have some tough to reach spots on the inside, namely on corners, hinges and the midpoint connections, but you've managed alright by the looks of it.

Yeah, lots of nooks and crannies to poke around in. I actually considered painting parts from the inside, but in the end it wasn't terrible just annoying to paint from the outside. Posted Image

View PostThorondor, on 21 August 2019 - 11:36 AM, said:

Otherwise, pout as one may at the trouble by the downspout, things are well underway and you'll soon be out and about painting that wall anyway! Posted Image

True!

I managed to do a little more work on the wall today in between breaks on a big store emergency project. First I put a coat of that mistinted paint on the primed mortar joints. Turned out the color was closer to a gray-ish army green than the caramel color of the wall. Not an issue really, it just means I might have to put on a couple coats (knowing me, I'll probably brush on a coat of the appropriate wall color on the dark spots, then get out the roller and do the whole wall in one swoop). The tuck pointing was also finished. To top it all off, I emptied an entire full tube of caulk into the wall (a lot of the mortar joints were just too deep to paint over but too shallow to tuck point - very much like the wall I did last year). There was a big crack between the wall and the fascia board so I filled that in too which took quite a bit of caulk. Unfortunately no pics of all this because I forgot my camera at home today, I'll try to get some pics of it tomorrow.

DSC09707JPG.jpg

Might not have as much time as I wanted to paint this year as I hoped - got another emergency project coming up and another big project after that. Still planning to paint the bottoms of the smaller boards for the greenhouse though and get the doors and windows squared away. Have to see how fast I can complete the big project maybe I'll have some time after that. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#166 Thorondor

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 02:04 PM

Posted Image

Ooooh, big, major, mega projects, on the double! Who needs free time, right, Zombie? Posted Image

#167 Zombie

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 01:33 AM

See my previous post as I added a pic to it. ;) Take note of the mortar joints in particular as you can see some are a different color due to all the caulking.

So this big project I've been working on is really eating into my painting time. I've made some decent progress on it, but it's just going to take time to finish properly. Luckily the weather is just gorgeous so I can fit in a little painting/maintenance here and there after my normal duties have been completed. Granted, it's not a ton of time, but it's something at least. Posted Image Since the first (mistint) coat is dry I pulled out an old gallon of wall paint which only had a little left in it and slapped that on over the mistint and caulked areas to lessen the shock value.

DSC09708JPG.jpg

For only one coat the paint did a decent job of hiding everything (that's the sign of a good paint). I painted the lowest course of block while I was down there and also cut in under the fascia board to about 3 inches or so. That means it's basically ready to roll the final coat on. Except for that pesky part I just tuck pointed. I checked on it and it seemed like the new mortar cured properly so I put on a coat of primer and then a first (mistint) coat at the end of the day (still wet when the pic was taken, btw).

rsz_1dsc09709.jpg

I might loosen up the downspout to gain access to the lowest mortar joint at some point. The mortar is sound, it's in that butter zone where it's not deep enough to warrant tuck pointing but not shallow enough to ignore it either. Caulking it is.

38vur7.jpg

Sorry, couldn't resist. :)

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#168 Thorondor

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 09:48 AM

Zombie does not skulk around, he wants all faults made plain and found, even if at multiple points and will promptly see to those joints! ;)

I see not many sins in your caulking work so your layered painting is paying off.

What did catch my wandering eye, inadvertently, was something else - at the corner, that wall edge looks quite irregular.

But you have enough on your hands as it is, so that case of the jaggies will have to wait. ;)

#169 Zombie

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 01:33 PM

View PostThorondor, on 26 August 2019 - 09:48 AM, said:

What did catch my wandering eye, inadvertently, was something else - at the corner, that wall edge looks quite irregular.

But you have enough on your hands as it is, so that case of the jaggies will have to wait. Posted Image

That's caused by years of unskilled drivers trying to back in unsuccessfully such UPS, fedex, suppliers, or even the plows in the winter. Thing is, there's no real way to repair the edge with new concrete as that'll just pop off eventually. An option would be to knock out those blocks and replace them with new ones but that's kinda difficult with the wall in place. I could probably bolt on an angle iron to create a new edge of steel but at this point is it really worth the time and effort? Unless a block is crumbling away, I'd just as soon leave it be and address it if/when something happens. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#170 Zombie

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 01:44 AM

So that big project I mentioned a few post back... I am tasked with cleaning up the lower flat of a building the boss owns. We've been renting out the upper flat for years and using the lower for storage and that's been fine. However, boss wants to rent out part of the lower flat and that means "spring cleaning" but in the fall. I had to make some tough decisions and throw things out just to make room - items which could probably be used but we suddenly lack the space to store it. "If in doubt, throw it out". The renter will have access to a bedroom, living room, kitchen and bathroom while we get 2 bedrooms for storage. After shifting everything out of the storage bedrooms, I swept them out and moved stuff back in (at least whatever was still good yet), which left the other rooms bare.

The last person to paint in the building was a handyman in 2001 - he used flat paint. That's not bad for a flat used for storage, but for a renter? Nope, that isn't going to cut it. Semi-gloss it is. Spent the better part of 4 days getting the bedroom and living room up to snuff with a fresh coat of paint on everything. Sorry no pics of this: too busy getting it ready as the renter was supposedly moving in on the 2nd of September. :( Turns out not yet (kinda) - he moved his stuff in but isn't living there yet. Anyhow, the kitchen and bathroom didn't require much painting as the handyman used semi-gloss in there (thanks to my suggestion at the time).

The biggest issue was the floor of the kitchen though, the toilet from the upper flat leaked a few years ago and caused the floor to crack and crumble in spots. Plus, a lot of people kept mentioning that the flooring had asbestos in it. Now, I'm not an asbestos expert but I did a little research online and then poked around discreetly in some corners to see what was up and didn't see any fibers or asphalt so it looked to be asbestos free. Still, I'm not going to take any chances just in case I'm wrong. Some online sites recommend either covering the old floor over with new vinyl flooring or to paint the floor to encapsulate any fibers. New vinyl flooring is out of the question so paint it is. There are two paints to use: epoxy (I got a quote for this and it's $100/gallon which is super expensive) or polyurethane floor enamel. Perfect, I always have that on hand anyway to paint the floor of the cooler or various tables around the shop. Started to roll it on but hit a snag with all those cracks.

DSC09714JPG.jpg DSC09711JPG.jpg

Not only was the paint soaking into the flooring in spots but the cracks were sucking it up too. Remembering back to the nightmare I had with the tables in the greenhouse early in the year I decided to check with the folks at the paint store to get their recommendation on how to proceed. They advised against epoxy because it is pretty aggressive and would probably strip the enamel off the floor and could even attack the flooring itself. They were not too keen about me priming with their best latex primer but said it was probably my best bet. Well, for the small cracks at least.

The bigger cracks and chunks missing required something else, so I ended up using some floor patching compound (gypsum based). Mixed that up a little on the dry side and troweled that on yesterday. It dried just fine, but then came the unenviable task of sanding the spots so it was sorta level. Posted Image I really wasn't worried about asbestos fibers getting kicked up because I made sure not to sand deeper than the polyurethane coat I applied earlier. What a mess. But I at least got the floor smooth. After sweeping up, I vacuumed the floor to catch any loose dust, then lightly washed it to get rid if the "fines". Forgot to get a pic of this, plus I was dusty from head to toe and didn't want to expose the camera to that. Posted Image

For the small cracks and areas where the polyurethane soaked in, I first hit those areas with some of the white primer I had left from the greenhouse escapade - figuring because it was thick it would fill the cracks in better. Worked pretty good overall. That dried almost instantly so I went over the white primer spots and the floor compound with the thinner grey primer so that hopefully I'll only need to use one final coat of polyurethane over the top.

DSC09716JPG.jpg DSC09715JPG.jpg

The brown rectangle is a carpet remnant I'm using to kneel on, you can still see white dust in it even though I pounded it out. Unfortunately it started to rain and the humidity level rose so I couldn't continue with the final polyurethane coat. I left a window open and had a fan blasting into the kitchen to circulate the air to get the floor to dry. Should be good tomorrow, so I'll try to get a pic of the final result. :)

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#171 Thorondor

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 10:01 AM

Should there be any doubt, here plain can you see the wonders Zombie makes come about! :)

Just thinking of the initial state you found that flooring in, and the possibility of asbestos being in the picture... Man, it sure took you some doing, but I believe you found the right answer starting with the floor patching compound.

It's already apparent from that last photo that you've pretty much got it sorted at this point.

I'd also say to the boss: after all this, a chicken dinner is well in order at the very least! ;)

#172 Zombie

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 05:07 AM

View PostThorondor, on 12 September 2019 - 10:01 AM, said:

I'd also say to the boss: after all this, a chicken dinner is well in order at the very least! Posted Image

Winner, winner, chicken dinner? Posted Image

This time I didn't forget to get a before picture:

DSC09717JPG.jpg

Nice and uniform, just the way I like it! Painting it wasn't hard or anything, just the usual: cut in around the edges with a brush making sure to pile on a thick coat, roll a small area until the film thickness is just covering then load up the roller and go over the area again. That builds up the paint layer so hopefully it will not peel.

DSC09718JPG.jpg

There was a small area that peeled up when I went over it with the roller, so I had to do a little emergency surgery with a flat blade screwdriver as my putty knife was nowhere to be found. Just carefully peeled those loose primer sections up and then slapped on a heavy coat of polyurethane over the top making sure not to press down too hard. Worked great. Oh, and you may notice that the lower drawers are missing - I took them out because they were so low to the floor that it was too difficult to cut in underneath them.

And what the heck, since I had the camera out how about a little pic of the doorway leading into the kitchen - this was the living room I painted.

DSC09719JPG.jpg

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#173 Thorondor

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 10:30 AM

The right paint at hand, followed as writ on the tin, time and again scores Zombie a win! :P

Really like the way it turned out. Too bad about that peeling hiccup you ran into, but you certainly were up to the task and coverage ended up nice and uniform.

Just look at the sheen on that floor. Too bad the place is rented already as a glance at that finish would've justified raised rental cost from the get go. ;)

#174 Zombie

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 01:44 AM

View PostThorondor, on 13 September 2019 - 10:30 AM, said:

Just look at the sheen on that floor. Too bad the place is rented already as a glance at that finish would've justified raised rental cost from the get go. Posted Image

Honestly, the place wouldn't have even been rent-able with the kitchen floor looking as bad as it did. A fix needed to be done or else... Posted Image

Well, since I had the roller in the polyurethane already, yesterday I rolled another coat on the long table in the back room and finally put a coat on the top of those two rolling tables I fixed up last year. I'll try to get a pic of that tomorrow.

Today I went over to the lower flat to inspect my work on the kitchen floor. Looked great obviously, and it seemed dry enough to walk on, what with the fan blasting on it all night long. I did notice some skips (just a couple spots). I touched one area up with the brush but missed the other which I'll do tomorrow. Figured that while I was over there I would do a little cleaning to spruce things up, so I washed the kitchen counter (red Formica top). The thing looked like crap with the "brand new floor". So I filled in all the cracks and dents and missing chunks with caulk. While doing that I noticed the formica wasn't sticking to the contact cement in some spots anymore so I pounded in some 1/2" brads to affix it to the counter. Then a coat of primer. And finally a coat of polyurethane to finish it all off.

rsz_dsc09721.jpg

I did tape off the metal edge and back of the counter in blue painters tape so I wouldn't make too much of a mess. Might put a second coat on that tomorrow if I have the time. And I'll be sure to get an after pic. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#175 Thorondor

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:55 AM

"Figured that while I was over there", Zombie says, and already you know he'll be getting somewhere. :cool:

Next thing you know, cleaned, restored, reset, primed and coated kitchen counter.

And eyeing a second coat...

Posted Image

:D

#176 Space Voyager

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 08:20 AM

Z, you've obviously changed profession! I mean, is there any original work left in your hands or is construction (renovation) your prime job?

You're obviously enjoying this so yeah, Thors reference is great!

BTW, what kind of polyurethane did you use for the cracs? Is that the same one you used for tables?

#177 Zombie

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 04:00 AM

View PostSpace Voyager, on 16 September 2019 - 08:20 AM, said:

Z, you've obviously changed profession! I mean, is there any original work left in your hands or is construction (renovation) your prime job?

Oh, no. All the painting and fixing I do is kinda a sideline operation when I finish with my other daily tasks or projects. I try to not let it interfere too much with my normal responsibilities but it sometimes cannot be helped. Thing is, our building is pretty old and requires maintenance (sometimes significant) so my goal is to minimize those big "Oh crap!" moments where something really bites the dust.

View PostSpace Voyager, on 16 September 2019 - 08:20 AM, said:

BTW, what kind of polyurethane did you use for the cracks? Is that the same one you used for tables?

Yup, same stuff. Polyurethane floor enamel. Wears like iron assuming you get it to stick and then dry properly. Posted Image

Before I forget, if you are wondering what the counter top looked like before the polyurethane coat, look at the red "marble" strip above the counter top. First thing I did the other day (when I had time) was put the final coat of polyurethane on the counter top and remove the tape.

DSC09722JPG.jpg

Nothing else was going on so I decided to touch up some of the woodwork in the kitchen. You know me, one thing led to another and I ended up just painting all the baseboards, doors and frames. (Except for the bathroom door which was pristine so I ignored that). I even painted one of the gas pipes sticking out of the floor to make that not look so bad. The black air vent I painted a week ago.

DSC09723JPG.jpg DSC09724JPG.jpg

The only issue I encountered was that I needed to tape the floor to protect the finish from the woodwork paint. That's all fine and dandy but removing the tape was a real bear as it pulled up some of the floor paint. Not a huge problem as I just brushed over those few areas at the end. The kitchen turned out nice all things considered. Posted Image

Here's the rolling tables sitting in front of the small garage door I fixed up last year.

DSC09725JPG.jpg

I have a nice little garden going there on the outside (from left to right: asparagus fern, sweet potato vine, rosemary and red dracena spikes). The next room has the long table:

DSC09726JPG.jpg

Yeah it looks a little dark, but I run without lights in the backroom quite often if it's sunny enough out during the summer. Might as well save some electricity. Too bad we don't have skylights, that would brighten things up without any electricity. But hey, I'm happy I finally switched out almost all the incandescent bulbs to LEDs now. The only thing I'd like to do yet is change out the fluorescent lights to LEDs. Someday.

The other day I started to work on the other red door into the building in the back. I took the kickplate off to reveal rust, and quite a bit of it on the metal door. First came the wire cup brush in the drill to remove some of the paint and rust. Any big chunks of rust were chipped out with a putty knife and hammer. Then I ran through the grades of sandpaper till I hit 100 grit. Just for giggles I hit some of the bad areas with some rust reformer. Surprisingly I had a can of red paint + primer spray so I used that to just to make it look a little bit nicer until I can paint it. I'll see about getting a pic of that up. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#178 Thorondor

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 09:33 AM

When coming out of the woodwork, Zombie does not muck about, restoration almost seems to sprout! ;)

In hindsight, I suppose painting the wood bits (baseboards, etc) first before tending to the flooring might have saved you some bother and would make better sense, as any paint dripping to the floor would be fine at that stage.

But, as you said, the wood just got a lucky break being tended to, as you happened to have the time to spare on it. And, no question, that kitchen got one heck of a makeover by your hand.

Moving along, thanks for naming the plants, it's always nice to put a name to a fa... I mean, stalk. :P

Looking at the backroom, I'm sure you can tell just how contrasting that glossy table looks against that poor neglected wall? Just saying... Posted Image

#179 Zombie

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 04:29 PM

View PostThorondor, on 18 September 2019 - 09:33 AM, said:

In hindsight, I suppose painting the wood bits (baseboards, etc) first before tending to the flooring might have saved you some bother and would make better sense, as any paint dripping to the floor would be fine at that stage.

But, as you said, the wood just got a lucky break being tended to, as you happened to have the time to spare on it. And, no question, that kitchen got one heck of a makeover by your hand.

True, the usual way of painting is top-down: ceiling first, then walls and doors and finally the floor. That way any drips are covered up as you go along. In this instance though I already had the floor done and figured it would be far easier to clean up latex trim paint on an oil finish (just use water) than it would be to clean an oil floor paint off of latex (with paint thinner). Besides, it's dirt easy to tape a floor as it's completely flat as it would be to tape the quarter round molding which covers the joint between the baseboard and floor. Taping that could be done but it would take a long time and require you to lay on the floor to see if you covered enough of the molding. I don't know about you, but I'm not getting any younger and would much prefer to kneel than to lay down on the job (unless you are sleeping in which case that would be ok). ;).

View PostThorondor, on 18 September 2019 - 09:33 AM, said:

Looking at the backroom, I'm sure you can tell just how contrasting that glossy table looks against that poor neglected wall? Just saying... Posted Image

I thought you were going to say something about the spider webs around the window. Posted Image But yeah the walls are just ugly concrete block. The reason for lack of any work on that is a couple fold. First, the concrete blocks are really thick and so they do block out the cold, but they aren't energy efficient by any means. Would make no sense to paint the walls if we insulate them. Secondly, block walls take a lot of paint to fill all the voids so I'd need a block filler paint first, then 2-3 coats of latex over that (can skimp on price for the first coat or two by using a lesser grade/mis-tinted interior paint and then a decent top coat). Then there's the issue of all the electrical panels in the room (directly to the left of where I took the picture) - those would be a nightmare to paint due to all the conduit. So I've thought about it in the past - it would just take too long which would mean the backroom would be all torn up for weeks on end too. Honestly I'd rather affix some lumber strips, insulate between them with foam board then cover it over with drywall, paneling or thin plywood. Posted Image

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#180 Thorondor

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 07:55 PM

It's definitely true, Zombie, you're not getting any younger. :D *ducks throwing knives*

Then again, neither am I, and having recently painted a gate with narrowly spaced bars on its bottom-half sporting interleaved spherical features while crouching for quite a while, through all that detailing, it wasn't overly long before I resorted to sitting zen-like on the floor instead.

Therefore, I can absolutely see the fun it would be taping the joint between the baseboard and floor on that kitchen... :sarcastic:

As for the concrete block walls, I now fully register from your explanation just why you hadn't already tackled that. Depriving the use of the backroom during such a lengthy intervention would most likely not be worth it. Ultimately, though, I suspect applying some panelling would make it look oodles better.

Brownie points from me all the same, for the fact you still considered the whole undertaking. :)




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