Let's Paint!


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#141 Zombie

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 03:58 AM

View PostThorondor, on 29 May 2019 - 10:32 AM, said:

They look pretty sturdy too (say, those are some thick teeth on that pitch fork), which, coupled with your regular care, makes it no wonder they've lasted as long as they have.

True, it's important to do a little maintenance on tools if you want them to last. I think that helps to prevent bigger problems (like rust) from getting out of hand. The other big thing is to never put a tool away dirty. Dirt holds moisture and prevents you from seeing what is going on beneath.

The pitchfork tines are thick for a reason. Normal pitchfork tines are thin and that's fine and dandy if all you are using it for is to move hay around. My pitchfork is made for digging into stuff where a spade fails... hard clay, gravel, stones, heavy root balls, etc. Once you loosen things up with a pitchfork, using a spade afterwards is easy.

View PostThorondor, on 29 May 2019 - 10:32 AM, said:

The rolling cart can definitely benefit from your further loving attention, though, as it's rather showing its age/handling in some spots.

Yup, it was an old second hand cart - not sure where we got it from so there is some denting and dings and scratches from the previous owner and ourselves. And to be honest, I used to treat it like trash letting it sit outside for long periods in the rain/snow. But for the past few years I've been coddling it by keeping it inside and at the very least priming the top ever so often. The darn thing is so noisy and rattles like heck when you roll it around but I intend to fix that eventually. Posted Image

- Zombie

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JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#142 Space Voyager

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 07:20 AM

Do you expect the tool coating to last for several years? In my experience any colour on any of the tools was... well, sanded away pretty quickly by the... sand! ;)

Actually I'm more annoyed by the colour particles making its way into the soil than I am by the degradation of the tools. Especially the wheelbarrow that had a thick layer of green colour and it is dropping off in flakes. I hate to see the chemicals in the compost, ending up in the salad garden.

#143 Thorondor

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 09:38 AM

@SV: I guess the question is then - how do you like your greens? Posted Image

I suspect you know what should be done to prevent such gradual 'poisoning by wheelbarrow' from happening; you take the pro-active stance and sand it thoroughly, then paint it over with several layers of whatever brand of quality paint you favour.

Or, you can do what I eventually did some three years ago and get one of these instead. Posted Image

Posted Image

[Official site]

It's far lighter than your usual wheelbarrow, no painting required, for all intents and purposes rust-free and just about nothing adheres to it as its surface has a treatment that makes it very easy to clean after use. Even has ergonomic grips for extra comfort. Sturdy too, as I've hauled large rocks with it with no problem. Posted Image


@Zombie: pitchfork + spade one-two punch for best effect understood!

I can see you've changed your ways with regards to the poor, battered old cart. It can't help squeaking a little in protest and disbelief of its newfound good fortune, but you'll bring it some contentment and fully earn back its trust soon enough. Posted Image

#144 Zombie

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:50 AM

View PostSpace Voyager, on 30 May 2019 - 07:20 AM, said:

Do you expect the tool coating to last for several years? In my experience any colour on any of the tools was... well, sanded away pretty quickly by the... sand! Posted Image

It depends how much you use a tool and what you are digging into. For what I do, I maybe get 2 years worth out of the paint job before reapplying. You gotta realize that planting in cemeteries is really taxing on tools. Big time. And it's for the simple reason that backfill over graves and under gravestones is usually gravel which tears the crap out of any paint job. Also, the "top soil" is usually not so much soil as it is clay, sand and whatever else is leftover from opening the ground up. It sometimes takes years to get the soil to a proper consistency by incorporating peat moss and other amendments to loosen it up. Of course, once it's loosened up you'll get lots of weeds because they'll get an easier foothold. Tradeoff, the saving grace is that it's easier to remove the weeds too. Posted Image

If you use a decent paint, it shouldn't come off much if used in sand occasionally. All the time? Well, then I probably would opt not to paint as the sand will clean the tool as you use it. Posted Image

View PostSpace Voyager, on 30 May 2019 - 07:20 AM, said:

Actually I'm more annoyed by the colour particles making its way into the soil than I am by the degradation of the tools. Especially the wheelbarrow that had a thick layer of green colour and it is dropping off in flakes. I hate to see the chemicals in the compost, ending up in the salad garden.

Again, I'm normally using the tools in the cemetery where it doesn't matter if a chip of paint flakes off. The amount of chemicals coming off those small chips is probably less than the chemicals found in the soil where you are planting your salad greens. Posted Image If you worry about it, then there are other methods.
  • Don't paint the tools, let them be and just sand off any rust at the end of the year.
  • Use plastic tools, though I'd worry more about the chemicals in the plastic than metal. And breakage.
  • Use aluminum tools. Might be more expensive and probably less sturdy than it's steel counterparts and they will wear quicker.
So there will be tradeoffs here as well. The thing with painting is that once you start, you have to continue to reapply. But as long as you remove the loose stuff, prime and then apply a few good top coats it'll last fairly long. The only part that needs to be touched up is the digging edge (for obvious reasons). Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#145 Zombie

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 04:48 AM

I've been working on pulling the small garage together at work the last few days (at least, when I have some time between projects). It's been raining here, and there are a couple leaks in the roof which I need to fix yet, but I figured I should put some things away to aid in that effort. (Btw, pro tip: if you know where a leak is from the inside but can't find it outside, simply pound a nail up through the roof. Then when you get on the roof you can look for the nail poking out, pound it back down and fix the issue. Sure beats taking a bunch of measurements and translating that when you are on the roof). Posted Image

Anyhow, I needed to put some boards away from the garage into the greenhouse, but I really didn't want to do that without sweeping it out and cleaning off the red table tops I painted earlier. (They had dirt and dried, caked on flower petals plus water stains and who knows what else). The first step was just to get things wet and loosen the crud up - not just water, soapy water... in this case I used some el-cheapo window cleaner. After I brushed that in and let it soak for a little bit I sprayed some industrial disinfectant right over it, scrubbed that in, let it sit for a little bit again, then repeat. By this point there wasn't anything sticking to the table tops anymore so I rinsed them off with the hose. Any spots you may see are wet areas that didn't dry yet.

2019-06-28 173933.jpg

All in all, they came out nearly as perfect as I left them. There are only a few spots which need some touch up, mostly it was high spots where the paint was scrubbed off by dragging plastic flats over them. The nice thing is that because I used a grey or white primer underneath it's easy to see where I need to hit it again with a little paint. No big deal. No job is complete without scrubbing off those smaller shelves and the park bench too. As an added benefit, I can lean them up against the building outside to bask in the sun and dry. Posted Image

2019-06-28 173950.jpg 2019-06-28 174004.jpg

Any spots you may see are water spots. I noticed them while scrubbing but didn't bother with more aggressive solutions until I could see how bad they were after they were rinsed off. I can probably get them off with vinegar or some dilute muriatic acid (or Hydrochloric Acid - HCl). Anything that's left I can touch up with paint. Besides, I need to paint the bottom of those boards and put another coat on the park bench yet.

All that just to put away boards from the garage. Posted Image On the plus side, I'm ahead of the game by getting the greenhouse cleaned out this early. And trust me, I'll need the time as I have some tuck pointing to do, a leaky roof to fix, a park bench and boards to paint, and eventually, new table tops for the workstations to build and paint. Busy! Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#146 Thorondor

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 07:02 PM

The results speak for themselves, Zombie, as is customary with your top notch handiwork. :)

The seeming downside, of course, is that there's no rest for the wicked and you're a bit of a perfectionist too. ;)

I do see those water spots, but you better tell yourself you have bigger fish to fry, because you do. :P

#147 Zombie

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 05:16 AM

Nearly a month with no updates? I must be slacking. Or busy. Or both. Posted Image

I managed to patch up the roof of the small garage. Hotter than hates on the roof that day, but I couldn't help it, it needed to be done. Posted Image It poured a few times since and no leaks in the places I previously identified and fixed. There are a couple tiny leaks in two spots I need to address yet. They were not there before so I think the reason I'm seeing them now is because it got really warm which caused the roof to expand.

Instead of using muriatic acid or vinegar to remove the water stains on the smaller boards I just brushed on a light coat of paint. It seemed like the fastest and easiest way considering I had the brush wet with paint already.

DSC09663JPG.jpg

You can really see what I touched up when the sun is shining on the boards, but in the shade it's completely unnoticeable. Ok, so why did I have a wet brush? Because I used up the rest of the first gallon of polyurethane which only had a little bit of paint left at the bottom (thinned down a little to get as much pigment off the walls of the pail). Yup, the park bench got one coat, then I did the boards, and after that I opened up the second gallon and applied another full coat on the park bench.

DSC09662JPG.jpg

It needs another coat though, some of the primer is still peeking through, and hey, the bottom needs another coat as well. In the background of the pic is a gray cart I use almost everyday for chores with a fresh coat of paint on it (used spray paint because I wanted to use up the can and get a fresh one). Posted Image

More pics on the way. Dropbox is being a little temperamental lately. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#148 Thorondor

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 07:26 PM

Plugging holes and covering stains, even when nobody complains! Posted Image

Alright, Zombie, I suppose one could get past the little touch-ups on those boards, fast and loose remediation job as it was, and your everyday cart got the last remnants of a spray paint as a makeover real quick...

By contrast, what really takes the cake here is how adoringly cared for the park bench now is and still stands to be, as stated in your plans for extra coating top and bottom.

Something is going on - is that a picnic with the ladies I sense in the air? Well, if so, more power to ya! Posted Image

#149 Zombie

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 05:36 AM

View PostThorondor, on 28 July 2019 - 07:26 PM, said:

Something is going on - is that a picnic with the ladies I sense in the air? Well, if so, more power to ya!  Posted Image

Nope, I almost always eat alone. Less yapping = quicker to finish and relax the rest of my lunch break. It's too warm to eat at the park bench anyway - I have a nice shady spot with decent circulation in the small garage... plus I can listen to the radio. Posted Image

So I finally got a chance to put a couple coats of gray polyurethane on the threshold I fixed earlier in the year.

DSC09674JPG.jpg

There are still a couple small cracks in the surface which haven't quite filled in yet so I'll need to apply a couple more coats just to ensure everything is sealed properly. And as usual, while I had the paint out, I put another coat on that noisy+neglected cart.

DSC09673JPG.jpg

You'll see I addressed the handle too. The only thing I didn't paint on the cart yet is the frame on the bottom. I'll take some pics of that when I get motivated. ;) In the foreground of the pic is a board I use frequently for various things, the bottom already has two coats, this is the top with one very heavy coat. Needs more coats to fill in the cracks though.

The paintbrush was still wet, so might as well apply another coat on the long table in the backroom (the one with the boombox on it).

DSC09676JPG.jpg

Much, much better. I pre-primed some scratches, stains and spots with a gray spray paint primer first (obviously). I believe it was the remnants of a can of automotive primer from Rust Oleum if any of you are curious. So that table should be set for a while now, probably will not be able to replace the top this year unless the boss gets me the new plywood.

We also have a flower cutter (or more accurately a stem guillotine) to cut multiple bunches of flowers at a time which needed some help. (Btw: I'm very proficient cutting multiple bunches with a knife as we didn't always have a cutter to rely upon, so I can manage without the use of the cutter, it just makes the process a little easier). The wood handle was in rough shape so I sanded it with three grades of sandpaper, applied a coat of linseed oil and sprayed two or three clear coat on top of that. Would be stupid to have a nice handle while the frame looked like crap, so I applied some polyurethane on that too.

DSC09675JPG.jpg

Again, much better. I actually constructed the base myself many years ago. The big square hole in the middle is for the stems to fall through into a garbage can, and the wedges underneath each foot of the cutter is to aid with cutting the stems on an angle. It had paint on it already, but was starting to wear thin in places due to heavy use.

So more projects completed, a couple still on-going and I just started another project while the weather is warm and sunny. Stay tuned for that. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#150 Thorondor

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 09:52 AM

Spreading the joy of fresh paint for there to be no blemish or taint. Beyond mere good taste, quality, uniformity - you really let naught go to waste, Zombie. Posted Image

Nice job on the stem guillotine. It sure looks sturdy and fit for the task.

Further note to self: no silly puns are to be made while you're handling a knife. Posted Image

Will stay on the listening post for news of new project reveals. Posted Image

#151 Zombie

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:31 AM

Ok, so this other project I mentioned before is to address the service door next to the small garage door (if you look back to my posts from last year about the small garage door exterior you can see how bad it was then already). There's a few things that need fixing:
  • The paint is really faded.
  • The kick plate is scuffed up and unsightly with rust stains.
  • The door in back of the kick plate is starting to rust where the screw holes are.
  • The sill plate has some rusty screws.
DSC09677JPG.jpg

That's the before picture. The brighter spots of paint exist because I touched up the door later in the year I painted it with a different type of paint which held up better (pro tip: don't use Rust Oleum in high sunlight conditions - it'll fade). First thing is to remove that kick plate.

DSC09678JPG.jpg

Now you can see how bad it really is. Because this is a west facing door, it will get wind blown snow against it in the winter and rain when it's above freezing. All that water has to go somewhere, and I think what's been happening is the water gets between the kick plate and the door and then works it's way into the screw holes which hold the plate on causing the metal door to rust. Gotta do something about that or else we'll be looking at a replacement door. I wanna fix that kick plate up so let's start with that.

DSC09679JPG.jpg

The before picture obviously (don't mind my big feet). It's made of stainless steel so it'll never rust, but it'll get rust stains on it. Kick plates normally have a brushed finish to them to hide scratches and the last time I painted the door I just sanded it lightly which worked out good. Over the years though, it got dinged up, scratched, stained and oxidized. First step is to sand to get rid of as much of the deep scratches and oxidation as possible. Trick is to use long parallel swipes while sanding to prevent the lines from showing later. In this case I used a sanding sponge (a sponge of sorts with a sandpaper covering over it) for this step (not sure what grit it is, but my guess is 150-ish).

DSC09681JPG.jpg

Wow, just that little bit of sanding and you can already start to see me taking the pic. The next step (I didn't show this) I used a Scotch scouring pad to scour the surface of the plate to give it a more uniform finish (this is where I left off the last time I did the door). Wasn't happy with it this time, so I used the scouring pad and some polishing compound in combination.

DSC09683JPG.jpg

(Accidentally took the pic looking at it from the other side). While it looks great in the pic, I still wasn't impressed. There were still scratches and dings present. I know it's not going to be perfect when I get done with it, but I want it to look a little shinier otherwise it'll look like I didn't do anything to it at all. Looking back, I probably could have went back to the sanding sponge at this point but the scratches and dings were not really deep enough to warrant it. I ended up going to the hardware store to pick up a few different grades of fine sandpaper. Please pay attention to what you can see in the reflection of the metal.

600 Grit

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Took quite a few passes to get it to this point. Should have really got a 400 grit to start - you live, you learn.

1000 Grit

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This is where you can start to see some detail. I think it probably would have been good enough but I still had another grade. Might as well give that a go.

1500 Grit

DSC09692JPG.jpg

It's a little "cloudy" around the edges so I might hit those areas again, but otherwise it's awesome. It's deceiving - it looks like a mirror finish, but in reality there are still fine scratches present and that's fine. I'd much rather it have some fine scratches to hide the inevitable onslaught heading it's way. Posted Image Sure wouldn't want to jump to 2000 grit.

So the plate is nearly finished at this point. Now it's time to work on the door so stay tuned for that... Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#152 Thorondor

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 06:00 PM

Service door under the weather? Zombie keeps it together! Posted Image

Of course, something must come apart a little first and you can't be faulted for the care you're sparing that so often assailed kick plate.

Long parallel swipes for uniformity, noted. Good thinking there.

One could very much start to see a significant difference in surface reflection at the 1000 grit point. And then you went for vanity, mildly cloudy as it may marginally remain in the end. When that thing is back in place and the sun hits it, though, the boss may have to grab himself some shades.

Let it not stop you - carry on in your pursuit of excellence! Posted Image

#153 Space Voyager

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 07:42 PM

DAMN IT, I'll need to do some work around the house, too! This can't be allowed to continue, Zombies are taking over the handyman-world! ;)

Bah, currently I can't compete. I'll be back!

#154 Zombie

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 12:33 AM

View PostThorondor, on 02 August 2019 - 06:00 PM, said:

When that thing is back in place and the sun hits it, though, the boss may have to grab himself some shades.

Very true, though the only time where reflection may be an issue is late in the day when the sun is low in the sky. At that time we have a van parked in front of the door and most likely we are closed too. Posted Image

View PostSpace Voyager, on 02 August 2019 - 07:42 PM, said:

DAMN IT, I'll need to do some work around the house, too! This can't be allowed to continue, Zombies are taking over the handyman-world! Posted Image

No worries, it's tough sometimes to get anything done at home because (at least for me) I'm usually too tired to do more after a long day at work. But if you break a project up into smaller steps you might be able to fit those in. Before you know it, you'll be done. :)

I did manage to do a little bit of work on the door the other day (no pics for any of this unfortunately). I sanded it down with some rough 50 grit sandpaper to knock down any glossiness and to give the new paint something to grab on to. After I sanded it, I ran my hand across the door to feel for any high spots and everything was smooth, however, my hand was blood red from the paint particles. Posted Image Because of that, I washed the door off with some soapy water.

I spent way too much time on the sill plate though. I thought I'd be able to get that fairly clean rather quickly with a wire cup brush on a drill, and it did, but there are grooves in the plate which were caked with hard grit and oxide (the plate is made of aluminum). Ended up scraping them with a putty knife, then wire brushing them by hand. And it still didn't end up looking decent due to the wire brush. So I might just spray it with a primer. Not only that, but there are three screws which hold the plate down which were a little rusty (not terrible though). My original intention was to replace the screws with stainless steel to prevent the formation of rust. Unfortunately the two screws on each end are so tight I can't possibly get them loose either by hand or a drill (probably would get them out with an impact driver but we don't have that). Also, the head of the center screw is so chowdered up there is no way of getting that out. Bummer. Well, those will just have to stay in place for now. Will update more next week.

So for a change of pace, how about a planting project? Remember the wall of the small garage I painted last year? Well, there is a small planting bed between the wall and the walkway and since we had some perennials left I decided to plop some in there to beautify that portion of the world. The thing was a weedy mess though, so I yanked it all out.

DSC09693JPG.jpg

I got 4 big piles out. The only thing I salvaged from that mess was a couple stems of Rudbeckia (black-eyed Susan)... you might be able to see it in the middle. That sheet metal pile has been sitting there at the corner of the garage since May when the HVAC guys removed a rooftop unit and didn't take along the scrap. Time to move that out of the way! Now, I could have just planted straight into the soil there, but there are a couple issues
  • There were so many weeds that the soil was all clumpy from the roots
  • There were probably a lot of weed seeds in the soil which were just waiting to sprout once I gave it some TLC.
My decision was to dig out approximately 4 inches (10 cm) of dirt and replace it with some composted cow manure. I also added some soil-less planting mix to loosen things up and top dressed the whole shebang with some 5-10-5 garden fertilizer granules.

DSC09694JPG.jpg

That was quite a bit of work but it turned out looking nice and clean. Now for the plants. I didn't have a huge selection to pick from, so I had to choose some varieties that can take nearly full sun conditions. I had 3 white coneflowers (Echinacea) so that would work as centerpieces. To fill in between those I had 6 Canterbury Bells (Campanula) and 8 Corkscrew Rush grass (Juncus). Plus that black-eyed Susan - so a total of 18 plants. Plopped those in, watered them and washed the concrete walkway.

DSC09695JPG.jpg

Beautiful! The wilty plant closest to the camera is the black-eyed Susan, but it'll bounce back now that it's watered in.

So there you go, a little non-painting home (urm, business) improvement. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#155 Thorondor

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 07:11 PM

That sill plate handful sounds familiar, Zombie. Posted Image

Both the part imagining one can get away with using an electric tool only to end up doing it the hard way by hand, and the bit regarding screws losing their head grooves and ending up dug in as is.

This video on YouTube provides some possible solutions to the screw predicament (including the impact driver one).

Also, my congrats on your planting project, as the outcome already makes a world of difference. Once the plants settle in and start growing and blooming it will make what once was a space of some neglect into a bright spot people will be happy to walk by once again.

Business improvement indeed! Posted Image

#156 Zombie

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 02:14 AM

View PostThorondor, on 04 August 2019 - 07:11 PM, said:

That sill plate handful sounds familiar, Zombie. Posted Image

Both the part imagining one can get away with using an electric tool only to end up doing it the hard way by hand, and the bit regarding screws losing their head grooves and ending up dug in as is.

This video on YouTube provides some possible solutions to the screw predicament (including the impact driver one).

I highly doubt any of those solutions would work in my specific case. Sure, for #2 screws it's all fine and dandy because you'll have a multitude of options to pick from and there's a darn good chance of getting it loose regardless which method you pick. The screws affixing the sill plate to the concrete are not #2, they are probably a #4 (I have a very nice #3 phillips screwdriver and that is a little bit small). And the head of the center screw is really, really chowdered up so I don't even know if a #4 would have enough material to grab hold of anymore. I'll try to get some pics of it. Posted Image

I do like that at the end of the video the guy says there's basically no way to remove a 4" #2 screw from wood. You're kidding, right? My method will wreck the wood a little, but you can always fix wood. My favorite way is to dig down into the wood underneath the head to make a little room, then use a locking pliers (aka Vise Grip) to latch on the screw and turn. That works quite often. After that, you can glue a plug of wood into the hole you made. Easy peasy! ;)

View PostThorondor, on 04 August 2019 - 07:11 PM, said:

Also, my congrats on your planting project, as the outcome already makes a world of difference. Once the plants settle in and start growing and blooming it will make what once was a space of some neglect into a bright spot people will be happy to walk by once again.

I hope so. I doubt anything will bloom this year yet (besides the white coneflowers) so maybe next year. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#157 Thorondor

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 11:12 AM

Posted Image

Man, whatever happened to Flower Power? :P

#158 Zombie

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 04:06 AM

Ok, I got some pics of the screws and sill plate. The first one is the middle screw (or what's left of it anyway).

DSC09696JPG.jpg

There's a little meat left on the bone so it might be possible to back out the screw with an extractor, but it's so corroded and rusty I'm worried it will not free itself from where it enters the concrete under the plate. I'm assuming there's an anchor under the plate in the concrete where the screw goes into... if it's a metal anchor, I'll bet the screw doesn't back out and just snaps because of the rust. And in that case it isn't going to be "just remove the bad screw and replace it with a stainless steel screw" because the anchor will have the remnants of the old screw in it. So I'd have to completely remove the sill plate in order to get at what's left of the screw. Posted Image

You can see how pitted the sill plate still is. I could sand it for another couple hours and maybe get it somewhat smooth, but the grooves would be difficult to get to the same finish. At least the plate is rough so I probably will not need a self-etching primer on it. Posted Image See? There's always a bright side!

Here's a pic of one of the other screws (the left one if you are looking from the outside, but it's the right one in this pic because I'm on the inside).

DSC09697JPG.jpg

My favorite #3 phillips screwdriver is in the slots and it's still a little loose. Granted, the heads on those screws are a little chowdered as well (due mainly to rust but also a little because of me trying to get them out). However, even if the screw was brand new it looks like it would still be a little big for a #3 driver which is why I believe it's a #4. Posted Image

The sill plate doesn't look too bad here. At least it's shiny. But the pitting is still pretty horrible. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!

#159 Thorondor

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 08:39 AM

Yeah, that screw has put you in a rather tight spot, Zombie. Posted Image

It's going to be dicey but you'll have to either leave it be, tucked in, comfortable and umoving in its slow decay, or take your chances and deal with the aftermath, whatever it is. The pitting may not be pretty but doesn't scare.

For a moment there it almost sounded like dental care. So, the question is, are you up for an extraction - will you dare? Posted Image

#160 Zombie

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 03:02 AM

View PostThorondor, on 07 August 2019 - 08:39 AM, said:

It's going to be dicey but you'll have to either leave it be, tucked in, comfortable and umoving in its slow decay, or take your chances and deal with the aftermath, whatever it is. The pitting may not be pretty but doesn't scare.

For a moment there it almost sounded like dental care. So, the question is, are you up for an extraction - will you dare? Posted Image

I think I'm going to chicken out on the dental extractions Mr T. Thing is, I'll only make it worse by removing. The plate is solid right now even with two screws holding it in place so I'd be stupid to muck with it. (If it aint broke, I'll "fix" it till it is syndrome). Posted Image  I think that by priming everything, caulking in the screw heads and then applying polyurethane it should last for at least another 10 years assuming you keep up with the maintenance (that's the key really).

So a slight change of gears for a little bit. Earlier in the year I noticed that some of the mortar joints of the smaller garage were starting to decay for some reason. The section I'm referring to is the part next to the wood paneling I painted brown last year. Fall will be here before I know it so I need to fix those joints and give the new mortar time to cure properly before I can prime and paint it. Here's the before pics (well, after knocking out the loose mortar and wire brushing the joints to remove the loose dust).

DSC09698JPG.jpg DSC09699JPG.jpg

Pretty bad. I wondered why only part of the joints were bad, so I followed the damage up til I hit the gutter. Low and behold, one of the gutter spikes was loose and the metal around it was all chowdered up. This allowed water to get behind the gutter and run down the wall. Ah ha! At least I know what the problem is and how to fix it (silicone caulk). The damage has been done though. Picked up a new bag of mortar mix from the hardware store and tuck pointed the joints somewhat properly.

DSC09700JPG.jpg

What I mean by "somewhat properly" is that in order to do a perfect job I'd need to remove a lot more old mortar with specialized tools (which I don't have) whereas I just used a screwdriver and a hammer. Also my mortar mixing skills are apparently a little rusty as I kept making the mix too dry so I had to add more water which is why some of the joints look almost black. Everything dried nice and light gray so it must be good. I'll see about getting a pic of that before the primer goes up.

Today was a gorgeous day so I wasn't about to squander it away by working on other projects. Time to paint that door! In the interest of comparison, I'm including a before picture so you can see what the difference is.

DSC09677JPG.jpg DSC09701JPG.jpg

Not bad at all! The only issue I noticed is that there are some scratches visible yet on the outside (probably shouldn't have used 50 grit for the initial sanding step, you live you learn). But hey, I'm going to paint another door and figured I can put on another coat at that time. The color looks pretty orange in the pictures but I think that is just caused from the sun being so bright. The color is more of a deep brownish-orange/red.

Since I had the roller out, might as well recoat the inside of the door too:

DSC09702JPG.jpg

This is closer to it's true color though it's still a little bit dark because I had the doors closed and lights off (to save energy) in the pic. You'll also notice that the finish on the inside is different from the outside. That's because the base coat on the outside was applied with a brush while on the inside it was all with a roller. That's for the best in this situation as those brush marks will hide the scratches better than a shiny glossy mirror-like finish. Posted Image

- Zombie

My X-COM Patch Kit For UFO Defense | Emergency XCOM Meeting spoof on YouTube




JellyfishGreen said:

Zombie: Empirical data's your only man, when formulating a research plan.
A soldier's death is never in vain if it makes the formula more plain.
A few dozen make a better case for refining that third decimal place.
They call me Zombie because I don't sleep, as I slowly struggle to climb this heap,
of corpses, data points, and trials, but from the top - I'll see for miles!




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